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Pressure Equilibrium

  1. Sep 13, 2014 #1
    2a+b⇌product
    if pressure is increased 3 times of the initial pressure the velocity of the forward reaction will be of___________ the previous velocity???
    Actually i got 9 times but the answer is given 27 times
    Can anyone please give the hint about it?
    Thanks in advance!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 13, 2014 #2

    Borek

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    What is the expression for the reaction velocity in this particular case?
     
  4. Sep 13, 2014 #3
    I think there no particular expression for this case but if there is please mention !!!
    I don't even have any clue how to solve this sum!!!
    Please help
     
  5. Sep 13, 2014 #4

    Borek

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    What is general expression for the reaction velocity?

    This is one of the first things taught when talking about kinetics, I don't believe you don't have it in the book or it wasn't shown during the lecture.
     
  6. Sep 14, 2014 #5
    (-da/dt)*1/2=-db/DT
    Sir this is the equation of rate law for that equation
    But how come it is related to the increase in pressure
     
  7. Sep 14, 2014 #6

    Borek

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    That's OK, unfortunately, that's not what I had on mind.

    Have you heard about rate equations? They combine (elementary) reaction equation with the reaction rate.
     
  8. Sep 14, 2014 #7
    Sir can u please give me one example of those sort of equations please!!!
    So that I can remember them!!!
     
  9. Sep 14, 2014 #8

    Borek

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    Google is your friend, try to search for "rate equation".
     
  10. Sep 14, 2014 #9
    OK sir
    Do u mean???
    Rate =[a]*k
     
  11. Sep 14, 2014 #10
    Do u mean that rate constant is related to pressure???
     
  12. Sep 14, 2014 #11

    Borek

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    Close. Please note it should reflect the reaction equation.

    Rate equation can be expressed using either concentrations or partial pressures of the substances involved in the elementary reaction.

    Don't sir me, and don't use textspeak (that is, no "u" for "you" and so on). This is described in the forum rules.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2015
  13. Sep 14, 2014 #12
    I still don't get it it can be written in the form of partial pressure also but how come it is a actually related to the increase in the pressure
    Partial pressure =mole fraction of the solute * total pressure applied
     
  14. Sep 14, 2014 #13

    Borek

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    Mole fraction is pressure independent (no idea why you list it as "mole fraction of the solute" - there is no solvent and solute in the gas phase). When the total pressure goes up, partial pressure goes up as well.
     
  15. Sep 14, 2014 #14
    OK I got it
    Actually I was doing wrong with this equation
    I was doing wrong with this step!!
    All the time I was considering only the partial pressure of a and thinking that the rate is the square of the pressure applied
    Actually I forgot to consider b also and then it will become rate is proportional to the cube of the pressure applied
    So if pressure is increased over 3 times then the rate of the reaction increases by 27 times!!!
    AM I correct?
     
  16. Sep 21, 2015 #15

    epenguin

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    As far as we know there are some known unknowns here. This cannot reasonably be a legitimate question - you either were given some more information or you should have been. There is no general law for the dependence of an overall reaction rate on concentration, it depends on the mechanism. If rate is proportional to a2b then you should be told, but then the conclusion is fairly trivial.

    This is not a rate law, this is restating the stoichiometry of your first equation: two molecules of a react with one of b, therefore two of a disappear for every one of b in the reaction.

    You probably need to quote the whole question and where it comes from.
     
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