Pressure of a diver is 10X

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I want to find when the pressure of a diver is 10X that when she is on the surface of the ocean. I know that at the surface, the diver experiences a pressure of 1 atm. But how do I go about finding the pressure under water? Do I have to consider teh partial pressure of water?
 
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  • #2
russ_watters
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Its a piece of cake really. Air pressure is due to the weight of a column of air pushing down on you. Water pressure works the same way (though a little easier since water is essentially incompressible). So all you need to do is calculate the weight of that column of water at a specific depth. Its the volume times the density. (the weight density of water is 62.4 lb/ft^3)
 
  • #3
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But also the density of water is 1,000 kg/litre by definition. And 1 Atm = a column of 76 cm of Hg (Torricelli) with a density of 13,6 kg/l. Now, how high would that column be if the Hg was to be replaced by water?
 

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