Pressure vessel certification?

In summary, Wes recommends purchasing the heat exchangers directly from a manufacturer that specializes in design and manufacture per the ASME VIII BPV code. You can find lots of companies that can meet your needs through ThomasNet.
  • #1
famine
6
0
Hi All

I'm looking into getting some shell and tube heat exchangers ASME certified for my company and was wondering if anyone could help me with the process. I know that we are trying to get a "U" stamp and need to get the code books that are required. There is also a few forms that we have to fill out and fees to be paid. I'm also aware that the heat exchangers will have to be welded by a ASME welder. I'm a little confused on the "Authorized Inspection Agency" that provides the code inspection, I'm assuming that this would be a physical pressure test and a reveiw of the design but I don't have any idea where we could get this done or how much the cost would be. Any information on the process, or facilities in the midwest that can do the testing would be appreciated.

Thanks
 
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  • #2
famine said:
Hi All

I'm looking into getting some shell and tube heat exchangers ASME certified for my company and was wondering if anyone could help me with the process. I know that we are trying to get a "U" stamp and need to get the code books that are required. There is also a few forms that we have to fill out and fees to be paid. I'm also aware that the heat exchangers will have to be welded by a ASME welder. I'm a little confused on the "Authorized Inspection Agency" that provides the code inspection, I'm assuming that this would be a physical pressure test and a reveiw of the design but I don't have any idea where we could get this done or how much the cost would be. Any information on the process, or facilities in the midwest that can do the testing would be appreciated.

Thanks

If you're looking for just a vessel pressure test certification then try to Google "hydrostatic pressure testing services" or something along those lines.

CS
 
  • #3
The designer/fabricator you select should certify the vessel. A certification stamp goes to a company not an individual. The Inspector that certifies the vessel for the company goes through a specific licensing process. If this is recertification of an existing vessel, ASME VIII BPV has specific guidance on the process. . . There is a company in Richardson TX pressure Sciences Inc that maymeet your specific needs.

Wes
 
  • #4
Hi famine, welcome to the board. As bwhartley mentions:
bwhartley said:
The designer/fabricator you select should certify the vessel. A certification stamp goes to a company not an individual. The Inspector that certifies the vessel for the company goes through a specific licensing process. If this is recertification of an existing vessel, ASME VIII BPV has specific guidance on the process. . .
The certificate (ie: U stamp) is given out by the National Board to a company certified to build pressure vessels per ASME Section VIII, div 1 or 2, BPV code. If your company isn't in the business of designing and building pressure vessels to the code, it's not worth your company's time and money to try and get certified. Purchase the heat exchangers directly from a manufacturer that specializes in design and mfg per the code. You can find lots of companies that can meet your needs through ThomasNet for example:
http://www.thomasnet.com/nsearch.ht...+ASME+Code&heading=26625004&navsec=prodsearch

PS: Welcome to the board Wes. :smile:
 
  • #5
famine said:
Hi All

I'm looking into getting some shell and tube heat exchangers ASME certified for my company and was wondering if anyone could help me with the process. I know that we are trying to get a "U" stamp and need to get the code books that are required. There is also a few forms that we have to fill out and fees to be paid. I'm also aware that the heat exchangers will have to be welded by a ASME welder. I'm a little confused on the "Authorized Inspection Agency" that provides the code inspection, I'm assuming that this would be a physical pressure test and a reveiw of the design but I don't have any idea where we could get this done or how much the cost would be. Any information on the process, or facilities in the midwest that can do the testing would be appreciated.

Thanks

We ABS Consulting is accredited by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) as an Authorized Inspection Agency (AIA). ABS Consulting provides authorized inspection services for manufacturers of Pressure Vessel & Heat Exchanger for more information mail to absgpatel@gmail.com
 

What is a pressure vessel certification?

A pressure vessel certification is a document that confirms that a particular pressure vessel has been designed, manufactured, and tested according to applicable standards and regulations to ensure its safety and reliability.

Why is pressure vessel certification necessary?

Pressure vessel certification is necessary to ensure the safe operation of pressure vessels, which are used in a wide range of industries such as oil and gas, chemical, and power generation. Certification ensures that the vessel meets specific design, fabrication, and testing requirements to prevent accidents and ensure the protection of both personnel and the environment.

Who performs pressure vessel certification?

Pressure vessel certification is typically performed by accredited third-party organizations, such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) or the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. These organizations have established standards and procedures for certification and have qualified personnel to perform inspections and assessments.

What are the steps involved in pressure vessel certification?

The steps involved in pressure vessel certification may vary depending on the specific standards and regulations applicable to the vessel. However, the general process includes design review, material inspection, fabrication inspection, testing, and issuance of a certificate of compliance. The certification process also involves regular inspections to ensure ongoing compliance with safety standards.

What are the consequences of not having a pressure vessel certification?

Operating a pressure vessel without proper certification can result in serious consequences, such as accidents, injuries, or even fatalities. In addition, non-compliance with certification requirements can lead to legal consequences, including fines and penalties. Furthermore, failure to obtain certification may result in the inability to obtain insurance or secure contracts with clients who require certified vessels.

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