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Prime Geometry

  1. Feb 1, 2004 #1
    Has anyone ever tried to make prime numbers into some kind of geometric equivalence? Such that prime numbers can be predicted through geometry?

    I was thinking of a universe beginning with one 3D unit, and evolving from that unit. That all subsequent units would have a relation to the first unit, and prime numbers would be the sequence by which new units are made. I.E 3,5,7,11,13 where each prime represents the number of units created in a steady equal sequence of time related to the first unit. The first unit would be the base by which all other units are made.

    The idea here is that we are the reality of Non-Existence. That reality would be a geometric definition, and it is an ongoing definition of non-Existence. Hence the universe is larger now than it was yesterday, and it grows by way of prime numbers in a geometric sense.
     
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  3. Feb 5, 2004 #2
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2004
  4. Feb 5, 2004 #3
    Yes indeed!


    Have a go yourself, and as the numbering system increases, be amazed at what you find:wink: see if you find the 'missing-function'!
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2004
  5. Feb 6, 2004 #4

    Zurtex

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    Has anything ever been prroven from that. For example it would appear that where x is a natrual number 4x^2 + 11x + 7 can never be a prime number
     
  6. Feb 6, 2004 #5

    matt grime

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    Re: Re: Prime Geometry


    Firstly,a s your grid is just a skew of a rectanuglar one, it can't be straight line patterns you mean, secondly, doing it for a few thousand digits isn't good enough, thirdly not sure I follow what you're trying to say, fourthly, how do you decide the Zeta functcion arises?
     
  7. Feb 6, 2004 #6

    HallsofIvy

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    Well, since 4x^2+ 11x+ 7= (4x+7)(x+1) one would hardly need "Ulam's spiral" to prove it never prime!
     
  8. Feb 6, 2004 #7

    Zurtex

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    Good point, doh!

    But non the less, very intresting.
     
  9. Feb 9, 2004 #8
    The prime spiral is interesting, but I was thinking more along the lines of 3D. A representation of the volume of reality. Such that only primes are used in an ever increasing volume, where any given prime represents the number of equal volumes used after the previous prime. The idea here is that each number of prime volumes would fit on a geometric shape that increases in size as each new prime is used. We would begin with one volume, then two, then three, five, seven, and so on. Such that seven represents seven equal volumes where each volume is the same size as the first volume.

    It's like a 3D puzzle that fits only one way - The prime way. The first piece is the center piece, and subsequent pieces fit with flawless precision.
     
  10. Mar 14, 2004 #9
  11. Mar 15, 2004 #10

    Janitor

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    Studentx

    The local public library here actually has Plichta's book on their nonfiction shelf. I looked through it once, and shook my head. It is either pure crankery, or else Plichta is just having his fun pulling a fast one on gullible librarians. As I recall, some ill-defined concept of his that he calls a "photex" plays a big role in his ideas.


    About 10 years ago I came across a library book by a mathematician, on the topic of math cranks who send their wild papers to universities. I wish I could remember the author's name. I think it started with a D. It was a fun read. There is a big supply of circle-squarers and suchlike out there.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2004
  12. Mar 15, 2004 #11

    HallsofIvy

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    "Mathematical Cranks" by Dudley Underwood.

    Actually, I started feeling a bit bad about laughing at some of these people who are clearly mentally unbalanced. Dudley Underwood was sued recently by one of the people mentioned in his book. I don't know the details but apparently the person was arguing that Underwood has misreprented what he had written. If I recall correctly the court ruled for the defendant on the grounds that "crank" was not well defined enough to be libel.
     
  13. Mar 15, 2004 #12

    Janitor

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    Halls,

    Thanks, that is probably the book and author I am remembering. Interesting to hear about the lawsuit.
     
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