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Problem book on manifolds

  1. Sep 21, 2007 #1

    ala

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    Is there some solved problem book about manifolds? (or where can I find solved problems on manifolds)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 21, 2007 #2

    mathwonk

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    every book on manifolds can be considered such. just regard all the claims and statements as problems, and the proofs as solutions.
     
  4. Sep 21, 2007 #3

    ala

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    I know that that theorems can be considered as hard problems... but I need some book with problems (problems that can be [and are] given on exams for physics students) and solutions.
     
  5. Sep 21, 2007 #4

    robphy

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  6. Sep 22, 2007 #5

    mathwonk

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    spivaks differential geometry volume one. or why not make them up yourself/ then they suit your students better.

    or look in guillemin and pollack. oh you want solutions.

    well i think that a bad idea. if you cant solve them yourself you should not be teaching the course, and your stdudents cant solve them either. or are you a student?

    even if you are, there is a very good reason books do not have solutions in them, it is harmful to learning. i just received a new edition of edwards and penney from the publsher yesterday and a gigantic two volume book of solutions to problems, how insulting and useless. i intend to burn it lest it fall into the wrong hands.

    solutions to problems are about as useful for learning as a video of someone else doing exercises. both these things are designed to make someone else rich, not to help you.
     
  7. Sep 23, 2007 #6
    Apologies if this is off topic. I think solution books are very helpful. But then again, I'm self-studying. I read the problem, and try to solve it, and then use the solution to either check my solution, or give me a hint if I'm stuck. Without having a teacher to offer any guidance, I need something to give me a prod in the right direction if I can't solve it myself.

    To the OP: one trick I've found is scouring the net for class web pages. They frequently have problem sets, and sometimes have solutions to those problems as well. Also, many schools post previous prelim exams sometimes with answers.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2007
  8. Sep 23, 2007 #7

    mathwonk

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    i suggest you stop prowling for other peoples solutions and spend more time thinking about your own.
     
  9. Sep 23, 2007 #8
    So if you have a student who can't figure out the answer to a homework question, your response is: spend more time thinking about it? You never give out solutions to your students? Or grade their work, and point out where their misunderstandings lie?
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2007
  10. Sep 23, 2007 #9

    mathwonk

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    as hard as it may be to beieve, yes, i did mean what i said.

    in fact i am generously grading your work now. guess what your grade is so far?
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2007
  11. Sep 23, 2007 #10
    It is hard to read the tone across the internet.

    You seemed dismissive of leveraging any solutions. I agree that the should be the absolute last resort. But for self-learners, the feedback they provide seems indispensible. If you have any other suggestings, as always, I appreciate your input.

    Back to the OP:
    These aren't solutions books, but they do have some worked examples:

    Bamberg,Sternberg: A course in mathematics for students of physics

    Arnold: Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics

    Lee: Introduction to Smooth Manifolds

    Solutions book in GR:

    Lightman: Problem book in relativity and gravitation

    Other solutions books I haven't used:
    There are Schaum's books in topology, and differential geometry that may be useful for you.
     
  12. Sep 24, 2007 #11

    mathwonk

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    what should we do when students ignore good advice, say, thats fine, i guess you will be ok, or just ask more bluntly when they anticipate getting a clue?

    we are not geting paid here so our advice has a tendency to be honest.


    it is sort of like the ethical dilemma one faces when asked to tell someone where to get cigarettes. should you tell them, or say honestly, do you realize those are bad for you?
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2007
  13. Sep 29, 2007 #12
    This book -Introduction to Tensor Calculus and Continuum Mechanics, by John H. Heinbockel is available online and for free at http://www.math.odu.edu/~jhh/counter2.html

    It isn't exactly what you're looking for but perhaps it has some solved problems.

    Good luck

    Pete
     
  14. Sep 30, 2007 #13
    I am looking for an introductory electromagnetics book in the language of differential forms. I am not looking for a differential geometry type of book with a small section on EM but all about EM in differential forms language. Any recommendations?
     
  15. Sep 30, 2007 #14

    robphy

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    I don't think there is one at the introductory level... with exception of
    http://www.ee.byu.edu/forms/

    A more advanced book that has a detailed but not exclusive discussion with differential forms is
    http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.librarians/503573/description#description

    A more theoretical monograph is http://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Classical-Electrodynamics-Progress-Mathematical/dp/0817642226
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2007
  16. Oct 1, 2007 #15
    Bamberg,Sternberg: A course in mathematics for students of physics

    This book is a very good treatment of EM using differential forms. It's not introductory, though.
     
  17. Oct 1, 2007 #16

    robphy

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    I would have mentioned Bamberg&Sternberg and Burke's Applied Differential Geometry....
    however, these aren't E&M books... although their sections on using differential forms in E&M are more than a few chapters....and certainly great places to read up on it.

    Here's some more advanced E&M texts:
    http://www.google.com/search?q="Multivectors+and+Clifford+Algebra+in+Electrodynamics"
    http://www.amazon.com/Differential-Forms-Electromagnetics-Electromagnetic-Theory/dp/0471648019

    You might want to browse: http://users.tkk.fi/~ppuska/elmag_alg.html
     
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