Problems with English

  • Thread starter wrobel
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  • #26
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I've always heard that the midwest "accent" is "standard" English because it is what all the news anchors use so it's becoming the standard, at least the the extent that ANYTHING is.
I think that it's not just because of the ways news reporters speak; I think that it's largely because midwestern ideolect has the closest phoneme to morpheme lexemic correspondence; i.e., we midwesterners tend to pronounce things as closely as practicable to the way we spell things -- e.g. we don't drop our ending 'r's, and change them to 'uh's, and such accuracies in many cases can make us easier to understand, especially for persons whose first language isn't English.
 
  • #27
phinds
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I think that it's not just because of the ways news reporters speak; I think that it's largely because midwestern ideolect has the closest phoneme to morpheme lexemic correspondence; i.e., we midwesterners tend to pronounce things as closely as practicable to the way we spell things -- e.g. we don't drop our ending 'r's, and change them to 'uh's, and such accuracies in many cases can make us easier to understand, especially for persons whose first language isn't English.
You're making my point. That IS the way news anchors speak so from that point of view it IS because it's the way news anchors speak. You are just getting down to the details of their speech patterns but that doesn't change the basic statement. Put another way, you're looking at the details and I'm looking at the bigger picture and we're saying the same thing.
 
  • #28
Klystron
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I have been enjoying quite a few Russian language series lately, subtitled in English. Noticed a tendency common to some Northern California native English speakers, many native French speakers and in upper-class British accents: educated characters tend to add a nasal component to emphasize certain sounds.

In other words the actors 'talk through their nose'. I forget the linguistic term.
 
  • #29
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It's informally called 'snooty'.
 
  • #30
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Once when Princess Anne fell from her show-jumping horse, a very polite press person asked her, "would you care to tell us exactly how you fell from your horse? -- to which she immediately replied "No, I wouldn't, thank you very much". The 'no' used a 2-tone falling tone, the 'would' was said strongly, the 'thank you very' was even-toned and rapid, and the 'much' was 2-toned rising -- all of it was somewhat nasal -- there was a nice brief pause after the 'no' -- the first-word diphthong was like a no-oo -- I not a fan of aristocracy or of monarchy, but I view Princess Annne's Mom Queen Elizabeth II as an exemplar of what a monarch should be -- it seems to me that she sees her position more as a set of duties than as a set of privileges -- she gets up early every day, and works harder than I do -- blessings upon her. . .
 
  • #31
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I have read that the Southern United States and certain remote areas such as Appalachia speak English with archaic accents derived from the 16th and 17th Centuries.
If you go to certain places such as Tangeir Island Virginia in the Chesapeake Bay, the natives still speak Elizabethan English. The dialect is called High Tider or Hoi Toider . When I heard it, I could not even identify is as a variant of English.

French in Quebec or in New Orleans, are very different than French in France.

But you can find similar variations in Europe, for example:
1585426998093.png
 
  • #32
phinds
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When I lived in Germany in the 50's there was a joke in German that I can't recall but the punchline was something like "We couldn't understand him - he's from Bavaria".
 
  • #33
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When I lived in Germany in the 50's there was a joke in German that I can't recall but the punchline was something like "We couldn't understand him - he's from Bavaria".
Oh, so he presumably was 'Bayerische', as in 'Bayerische Motoren Werke'?
 
  • #34
phinds
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Oh, so he presumably was 'Bayerische', as in 'Bayerische Motoren Werke'?
Yes, I said he was was from Bravaria so of course he was Bravarian (or in German, Bayerische)
 

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