1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Projectile Motions

  1. Mar 28, 2005 #1
    Hi, I'm trying to find out how a function relating [tex] \theta [/tex] and time together. this is because, in many cases of projectile motion, they do give us say, the angle at various spots of a particle's trajectory or velocities so that we solve for theta. Is it possible to create a function so that I know theta straight away just by substituting in the variable time??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 28, 2005 #2

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    What is the angle [itex] \theta [/itex]...?Is it somehow connected to the double-slit experiment...?

    Daniel.
     
  4. Mar 28, 2005 #3
    What do projectiles have to do with the double slit experiment? :confused:
     
  5. Mar 28, 2005 #4

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    They do,u see,it's all clear to me:projectiles,double slit experiments and Copenhagen vs.other QM interpretations...If u don't believe me read here and here


    Daniel.
     
  6. Mar 28, 2005 #5

    SpaceTiger

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    And in case you're not doing the double slit experiment... :wink:

    [tex]v_x=v_{x,0}[/tex]
    [tex]v_y=v_{y,0}-gt[/tex]
    [tex]x=x_0+v_{x,0}t[/tex]
    [tex]y=y_0+v_{y,0}t-\frac{1}{2}gt^2[/tex]

    Now I'm not sure what you mean by [tex]\theta[/tex] either, but it could be:

    [tex]tan(\theta)=\frac{v_y}{v_x}=\frac{v_{y,0}-gt}{v_{x,0}}[/tex]
    [tex]tan(\theta)=\frac{y}{x}=\frac{y_0+v_{y,0}t-\frac{1}{2}gt^2}{x_0+v_{x,0}t}[/tex]

    If not, please clarify what you mean by [tex]\theta[/tex].
     
  7. Mar 28, 2005 #6

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Aren't "x" and "y" perpendicular,so the angle between them [itex] \frac{\pi}{2} [/tex] and the tangent of this angle is [itex] \infty [/itex]...?The same goes for velocity vector's projections onto the rectangular Oxy...:bugeye:

    Daniel.
     
  8. Mar 28, 2005 #7

    SpaceTiger

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Uh, what? This isn't the angle between x and y. "x" and "y" represent the sides of a right triangle with one vertex at the origin. The angle is relative to the horizontal.
     
  9. Mar 28, 2005 #8

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    You're right.I think among your 2 options lies the OP's answer to his question,unless it's something which would defy logics.

    Daniel.
     
  10. Mar 29, 2005 #9
    hey, that helped, thanks alot.

    I was not looking for the double-slit exp. though lol. I wouldn't have posted that in the classical physics forum. and that helped too, btw.

    : )
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Projectile Motions
  1. Projectile Motion (Replies: 3)

  2. Projectile Motion. (Replies: 2)

  3. Projectile motion (Replies: 2)

Loading...