Property tycoon

  • Thread starter brewnog
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  • #1
brewnog
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I've bought a house! :rofl:

And have spent the last 2 weeks packing, moving in, unpacking, decorating, and buying and building furniture!

It's all very scary, and I'm now tied down with a mortgage until 2037, but it's great fun!

I think I probably qualify for entry in the world flat-packed furniture championships, and if I have to paint another wall magnolia (or "soft linen") ever again, I might cry, but it's my house, all of my own!

Yay!
 

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  • #2
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Congratulations.
 
  • #3
Moonbear
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Congratulations!!! It's wonderful to become a homeowner. It'll take at least a year before you wish you had a landlord to call to fix things again. :biggrin: Enjoy your new pad! Wow, you've even painted and decorated already. I think you need to offer some tips to zenmaster. He keeps reporting his walls are still bare years after his move.
 
  • #4
turbo
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Congratulations! We managed to sell our "spare" house last spring. It's nice to own your own place - not so fun to maintain two of them through a long Maine winter.
 
  • #5
JasonRox
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Congrats!

That's awesome!

Man, I watch shows like Flip That House and I so want to do up my own house one day. And you're doing it right now!

It's probably hell though.
 
  • #6
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Congrats that is awesome!
 
  • #7
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Woah 2037.
Congratulations.
 
  • #8
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I hope you enjoy every minute there. Do you have a yard?
 
  • #9
brewnog
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I have more than a yard, it's a patio! With a shed and a garage. There's not much growing there now, but I'm going to get a couple of apple trees, and a massive herb garden.
 
  • #10
Astronuc
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I've bought a house! :rofl:

And have spent the last 2 weeks packing, moving in, unpacking, decorating, and buying and building furniture!

It's all very scary, and I'm now tied down with a mortgage until 2037, but it's great fun!

I think I probably qualify for entry in the world flat-packed furniture championships, and if I have to paint another wall magnolia (or "soft linen") ever again, I might cry, but it's my house, all of my own!

Yay!
Congratulations on becoming the proud owner of a 30-yr mortgage. :biggrin:

Congrats, brewnog!
 
  • #11
30 year mortgage? Ugh...and I thought years of student loans was bad.

Congratulations on the house, I hope it's worth it!
 
  • #12
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I have more than a yard, it's a patio! With a shed and a garage. There's not much growing there now, but I'm going to get a couple of apple trees, and a massive herb garden.
How perfect for you! Take my advice, and get dwarf apple trees, you will enjoy them more in the long run. And make good friends with the neighbors who have great yards, they can tell you what grows well in your area.
The house I live in now, is only 15 miles from my old house, but a world of difference, in what grows well. Its my 3rd year here, and I will still be experimenting this garden season. Which of course, is half the fun.
 
  • #13
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Outch, do you people all have 30 year loans? Thats crazy to pay a loan off that long. Your paying the bank twice the price of your house in interest.

Brewski, whatever you do, pay off that house within the next 10 years, tops.
 
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  • #14
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It does make me wonder what interests rate in the UK are. I locked in a very low rate{4 3/4}, but still pay more to the principal each month, to shorten the duration of the loan.
 
  • #15
Moonbear
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Brewski, whatever you do, pay off that house within the next 10 years, tops.
What planet can someone do that on? I haven't seen any real estate short of a hovel that inexpensive. 30 years is a standard mortgage term. If you pay a bit extra, you can pay off in maybe 25 years.
 
  • #16
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I never said the property had to be cheap. For example, lets say I buy a townhouse for $350k. The mortgage is going to be somewhere in the ballpark of $2-3k a month. Now im only one person. I still have 2 other rooms upstairs and a basement that I can rent out to some buddies of mine and collect very easily that 2-3k a month. Now I use my paycheck each week to pay on top of the rent. Then I buy another house, and I do the same. Before you know it, you have a lot of money.

When I went to california, they guys house I sayed at did this. He now has over 200million bucks and 2,500 properties. Its not easy, but it can be done. He came here with a suitcase, just like my parents, and now hes doing very well.

Its very possible to make a ton of money if you want to. And actually, Its making me wonder if I want to be an engineer scraping up 60k a year or go into real estate where I could make millions.

USA, land of opportunities for those willing to take advantage of them. :biggrin:
 
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  • #17
Math Is Hard
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I think you'd make an excellent slumlord.
 
  • #18
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I think you'd make an excellent slumlord.
:rofl: ...........your rent just went up. :mad:


My slums are number one in kahzakstan.
 
  • #19
Moonbear
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Ugh, that assumes you actually want to live with other people. Nope, I'd rather be in debt up to my eyeballs than have roommates ever again, and sharing a house like that sort of defeats the point of owning your own place. Also, if the house is zoned as a single family residence, what you've just described is illegal. Not sure how you'd manage to convince anyone to give you a mortgage so far above your means either, but I guess that's why we're hearing about such a high rate of bankruptcy sales now.

I also forgot how much more expensive housing in your area is too! Yikes! $350K only gets you a townhouse now? And to think I was balking at seeing $150K pricetags on townhouses around here. I can't quite fathom buying a townhouse when for the same price you can get a single-family house with land.
 
  • #20
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And to think I was balking at seeing $150K pricetags on townhouses around here.
Thats was the price of a townhouse here about 15 years ago. 350k gets you a really, really bad townhouse. A nice one is going to be at least 450k. A single family home is around 700k. The prices are a bit absurd now. But if I wanted to invest in housing, I would do it where you live because its cheap. I can buy and rent much more houses where you are than where I am, and that equates to more money for me.

Its not easy, its really not easy. But if you want to work very hard and sacrifice now, you will be living large in 20 years.

Nope, I'd rather be in debt up to my eyeballs than have roommates ever again, and sharing a house like that sort of defeats the point of owning your own place
See, you are looking at a house as 'owning your own place'. I look at it as a 'place to make money and then buy a second house'.

For me, its not about living by myself, its about cashing in on that house as much as possible.
 
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  • #21
turbo
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What planet can someone do that on? I haven't seen any real estate short of a hovel that inexpensive. 30 years is a standard mortgage term. If you pay a bit extra, you can pay off in maybe 25 years.
My wife and I paid off our mortgage (ca 1990) in about 10 years by paying aggressively against the principal, and we bought our present house with cash. We are not wealthy. We both work, and have done so all of our lives, although I am pretty much side-lined with a medical disability now. Debt is seductive, but it is a poison that can control your life. Don't indulge in it if you cannot also save as you pay it off.
 
  • #22
Moonbear
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My wife and I paid off our mortgage (ca 1990) in about 10 years by paying aggressively against the principal, and we bought our present house with cash. We are not wealthy. We both work, and have done so all of our lives, although I am pretty much side-lined with a medical disability now. Debt is seductive, but it is a poison that can control your life. Don't indulge in it if you cannot also save as you pay it off.
Having two incomes makes it a heck of a lot easier, but for some of us, it's not an option.
 
  • #23
FredGarvin
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Not knowing what tax laws are like over by Brews, it is kind of nice to be able to deduct mortgage interest from your taxes. That's my largest deduction.
 
  • #24
turbo
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Having two incomes makes it a heck of a lot easier, but for some of us, it's not an option.
I saved while I was single as well, though I was not earning very much money. The trick is to adjust your lifestyle so that your expenses are lower than your earnings. I had my guitar, a modest stereo system and my clothes. No TV - I borrowed books from the local library, and I never ate out and only rarely bought any prepared foods, even the "cheap" stuff like macaroni and cheese - my homemade M&C was cheaper and tasted lots better. I lived within walking distance of the mill where I worked, had a used motorcycle to get around most of the year, and hitch-hiked when it was too icy to use the bike. At no time did I feel that I was deprived. When I moved in with my GF (now my wife of 32 years), she was way behind in her rent since she had been laid off from the mill earlier. I got the rent caught up, and when the mill closed, we moved LOTS of times so that I could follow construction work around and she found jobs in textile mills and shoe shops. We were always comfortable and well-fed,and our apartments were clean, if spartan, and we saved money for a down-payment on a future home.

There are immigrants doing farm-work here in Maine that are earning modest wages, and they send money back to their families every week. They are just not living the debt-ridden "American Dream" - they are living within their means. Disciplined frugality is not poverty - it is self-empowering and liberating. If we define ourselves by the possessions we surround ourselves with, we are not giving ourselves much credit.
 
  • #25
Moonbear
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turbo, just so we're clear...I agree with you entirely in terms of living within one's means and taking out a mortgage that one can still afford to save while paying off. That's really not an issue for me. But, I'm also sick and tired of moving, so the next house I buy is going to be one that I can envision myself living in for the rest of my life, not just a starter home that I'll move out of in a few years. Mortgage interest is tax deductible, so if you get a mortgage with a similar montly payment as rent, you're still better off in the long run to buy earlier and take more time to pay off the mortgage than to throw the money away as rent while saving up so you can pay off a house in 10 years instead of 30. If it still takes you the same amount of time to get to own your own home, all those years of rent that don't go toward owning anything are just wasted money. Of course, renting makes more sense when you're moving frequently.

It's just not reasonable to think someone is going to pay off a home mortgage in 10 years on a single income, unless of course you're earning 6 figures. The housing market just isn't that cheap anymore. When you bought in the 90's, that was the perfect time to buy. I wish I had been able to get into the housing market then, before all the prices practically tripled. If I was working instead of going to grad school, and bought a house when my friends bought theirs, I could have sold a house in NJ and moved out here and bought 2 or 3 houses outright on just the profit from the sale.
 

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