Proportionality of T to R, m1 and m2

In summary, the conversation is about an experiment that was done to investigate an equation involving F=4pi^2m2r/T^2. The graphs of the values were drawn and the Log values were used to find the power of proportionality. The final equation found was T=2pi sqroot m2r/sqroot m1Ug, with T being proportional to m1^-.5, m2^.5, and r^.5. The conversation also includes a link to a related image.
  • #1
bayan
203
0
We have done an experimnet latly in which we did an investigation on

m1Ug=4Pie^2m(2)r m2/ T^2

We drew the graphs of the values that we found, then we drew the Log values to fing Gradiant to find the power of proportionality.

in our experiment gradiant of my Log values were T prop m2^.53 T prop R^.508 and T prop m1^-.35

using math I got got

T^2 m1Ug =4pie^2 m2 r
T^2 = 4pie^2 m2 r / m1Ug
T = 2pie Root m2r/ root m1 Ug

Which makes it

T prop m1^.5 or root m2
same for R
and ^-.5 for m1 or 1/root m1

does that seem good? even though keplers third law stats T^2 is prop to r^3
 
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  • #2
It's hard to say! You didn't tell us what this equation was supposed to be so I don't know what Kepler's third law has to do with it! I would prefer you used "pi" rather than "pie" for [tex]\pi[/tex]. I thought at first this involved the exponential
e^(2m)! My real problem is distinguishing between "m(2)" and "m2". Are they intended to be the same thing? And are "r" and "R" supposed to mean the same thing?
 
  • #3
Sorry for the mistake.

Here is the equasion

F=4pi^2m2r/T^2 F is m1Ug.

so now m1Ug=4pi^2m2r /T^2

I did some work out and mate T to be

T proportional to m1^-.5
T prop to m2^.5
and T prop to r^.5

as T= 2pi sqroot m2r / sqroot m1Ug

is that right?


here is a link

http://users.tpg.com.au/timedil/cent.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #4
Yes, that is correct.
 

Related to Proportionality of T to R, m1 and m2

1. What is the relationship between the proportionality of T to R, m1, and m2?

The proportionality of T to R, m1, and m2 refers to the direct relationship between the tension (T) in a string and the mass (m1 and m2) attached to either end of the string. This means that as the tension in the string increases, the masses attached to the string will also increase.

2. How does changing the mass of one object affect the proportionality of T to R?

Changing the mass of one object (m1 or m2) will directly affect the proportionality of T to R. As the mass increases, the tension in the string will also increase. This is because the added weight of the mass creates a greater force on the string, causing an increase in tension.

3. Is there an inverse relationship between R and T in the proportionality equation?

No, there is no inverse relationship between R and T in the proportionality equation. The tension (T) in a string is directly proportional to the radius (R) of the circular motion, meaning that as R increases, so does T.

4. How does the proportionality of T to R change if the length of the string is altered?

The proportionality of T to R is not affected by the length of the string. This means that regardless of the length of the string, the tension (T) will remain directly proportional to the radius (R) of the circular motion.

5. Can the proportionality of T to R, m1, and m2 be used to calculate the mass of an object?

No, the proportionality of T to R, m1, and m2 only describes the relationship between tension and mass in a system. It cannot be used to directly calculate the mass of an object. Other factors, such as the acceleration due to gravity, must also be taken into account when calculating mass.

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