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Proving that eggs is eggs.

  1. Jan 29, 2007 #1
    It's about two weeks before my course starts, and I'm looking to find a new experiment; if anyone still remembers the chocolate milk and milk experiments with sugar in, they were alot of fun for me and I hope people enjoyed them as much as I did.

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=111458&highlight=milk

    So can anyone suggest something that's not obvious, but an experiment to test it that would be fairly easy to set up.

    At the moment I have a few ideas: for example: what food type goes off first, using high protein, fat and sugar and carbohydrate and fibre foods to see which stay fresh the longest.

    or maybe an experiment involving my dog, I'm kind of stuck on what to do.

    If anyones interested in a little light hearted experimentation - under scientific conditions of course - well as close to science as I can get - please suggest any ideas.:smile:
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 29, 2007 #2

    Moonbear

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    I'm afraid to suggest anything. Last time, your cat died during the experiment. :cry:
     
  4. Jan 29, 2007 #3
    You should put mentos into diet coke.
     
  5. Jan 29, 2007 #4
    Don't remind me, but that wasn't due to the experiment.:cry: :frown:

    I think that's covered pretty much by Mythbusters.

    Thanks anyway. All suggestions welcome.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  6. Jan 29, 2007 #5

    berkeman

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    Sorry, I wasn't part of the old thread (and it's too long for me to make sense of quickly), so I'm not clued in. What is the class, and what are the rules for picking a project? I'd love to suggest something, but I'm not sure of the guidelines.
     
  7. Jan 29, 2007 #6

    Moonbear

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    Are you sure? That was a lot of sour milk to drink. :rolleyes:

    It's not for a class. It's something to keep him occupied while not in classes. Last time he did a comparison between regular milk and chocolate milk (and then I think he did a modification of that with various amounts of sugar added to the milk) to determine which turned sour first after sitting out at room temperature. It was mostly being silly, but in the end, a fun exercise that I thought would be good to use with elementary students to teach about things like experimental controls...and uncontrolled variables, like the cat having a preference for one of the bowls of milk. :biggrin:
     
  8. Jan 29, 2007 #7
    As Moonbear said it's just for fun so any suggestions are welcome.

    Aye it was, but let's not dwell on the past.

    :biggrin: I'm surprised anyone still remembers.
     
  9. Jan 29, 2007 #8

    berkeman

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    Fair enough, sounds like fun. What areas of science can it be in? Sounds like the last one was mostly biology and chemistry. What other sciences are fun for you to play in? You could build a 5MW laser for fun like in the movie "Real Genius" :biggrin:
     
  10. Jan 29, 2007 #9
    Or I could do a Dr. Michio Kaku and build a particle accelerator in my basement. But I have two weeks, so keep it simple.:smile:

    5 jigawatt at most :smile:
     
  11. Jan 29, 2007 #10

    turbo

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    Remember the "hot water freezes faster" thing? You could take a water sample, heat it on the kitchen stove, removing samples every 10 degrees or so, and place them in marked containers in your 'fridge. When they have all come down to 'fridge temp, put them in the freezer and keep track of when they freeze. It might be better to have a chest freezer for this part of the experiment to keep temperatures consistent.
     
  12. Jan 29, 2007 #11

    DaveC426913

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    I'd really like experimental confirmation of the complete falsity of the direction of water down the toilet myth.

    While it's all well and fine to refute it with logic, it would be nice to actually be able to answer the question "How would you know? Has anyone actually done it?"
     
  13. Jan 30, 2007 #12
    Both good ideas, I'm kind of interrested in the ice one myself, and it's much easier to set up. Anyway I won't start it 'til this weekend, and I have a week off work next week.

    Keep 'em coming.
     
  14. Feb 1, 2007 #13
    OK assuming there are no other ideas I'm going to go with the Ice water and warm water thing. I have a freezer so this should be quite simple to set up. Thanks for the input.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2007
  15. Feb 2, 2007 #14

    DaveC426913

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    I guess I'm not enthused about the ice cube experiment is because it has been demonstrated with The Mpemba Effect.
     
  16. Feb 2, 2007 #15
    OK so it's a given. Back to square one.

    The orginal milk experiment revolved around a disagreement: is sugar the cause of chocolate milks preservation and not something else, answer: no: that's precisely why it doesn't go off as quickly as normal milk. So what I've got to think of is an experiment that challenges a notion; doesn't have to particularlly grand or involve any laws of thermodynamics, it just has to be something so simple that no one has ever thought about why? I have a whole week or so, so if you can think of anything? Let me know, I'd like to start the experiment on Sunday, but if it's quickly proven, it can run from x till the Sunday after that; that's when I'm back to work.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2007
  17. Feb 3, 2007 #16

    DaveC426913

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    Well, the toilet/sink draining thing would require involvement from others' sinks, including those from the southern hemisphere, so that's maybe not so easy...
     
  18. Feb 3, 2007 #17
    I once did a thought experiment about why people think that busses always etither take ages or turn up in threes, but I think that'd be dull:smile: .

    But it could be anything really, blue tacks an interesting material, maybe something to do with that, like glass it's a sort of "viscous" solid?
     
  19. Feb 3, 2007 #18

    turbo

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    I actually proposed a slightly different experiment, though, which involves bringing all the water samples to the same temperature (say, in a refrigerator) before putting them in the freezer. This experiment would demonstrate whether water will freeze faster or slower based on its previous temperature history. One possible factor my be that heat can drive off dissolved gases in the water.
     
  20. Feb 3, 2007 #19
    Well reinstated then, you're the front runner so far as the other experiment may be a little awkward.:smile:

    So for example with have five samples all of the same water source, all heated to different temperatures, and then each is cooled to say 5 degrees in the fridge before being placed in the freezer. I have some ice cube holders, it will be simple to visually inspect each cube to denote when the water has all frozen without desturbing the ice too much, and the level of the freezer is consistently the same temperature, as I have different enclosed levels.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2007
  21. Feb 3, 2007 #20

    turbo

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    Yes, that's the thought. Start out with a big pot of cool tap water, and take a sample out of that, then start heating the water, taking samples periodically as it heats up. I would suggest one more wrinkle - once the water gets to boiling temperature, take a sample, and then let the water boil for 10 minutes and take another sample and perhaps wait another 10 minutes and get a final sample. If de-gasification of the water effects the rapidity with which it freezes, we should expect that there might be a time-related factor as well as temperature-related.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2007
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