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Publishing subforum?

  1. Nov 20, 2009 #1

    tiny-tim

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    Perhaps there should be a subforum related to publishing, and/or writing theses?

    (would probably include LaTeX help)

    For example, the following was posted in General Math, and it doesn't seem to fit into the name or description of any other forum …
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 20, 2009 #2

    Moonbear

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    I don't think it's a necessary subforum. If someone is working on a thesis, they should be talking to their mentor to find out what's proper formats for their field. If they are trying to get a manuscript published, they should be looking at the instructions to authors for the journal where they are submitting, or talking to the editors, if they have questions about format.
     
  4. Nov 20, 2009 #3

    Kurdt

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    One post doesn't usually warrant a subforum. As Moonbear has mentioned, they should be speaking people in their department for that sort of thing.
     
  5. Nov 20, 2009 #4

    drizzle

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    I think it’s a great idea! not necessarily for writing a thesis, guidelines can be offered for publishing papers and articles, alongwith instructions on how to use certain programs to analyze data/do graphs etc.
     
  6. Nov 20, 2009 #5

    Dembadon

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    I think that most programs which perform the functions you mention have their own (often unofficial) forums which would better satisfy this need.

    For example:

    http://www.kluid.com/mlib/index.php (Matlab)

    Such forums are already established and contain a great deal of information.
     
  7. Nov 20, 2009 #6

    Moonbear

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    The best place to get that information, as I already stated, is from the editors/publishers of the journal where you want to publish. The criteria vary from journal to journal, and every journal has a very comprehensive list of instructions to authors. And, frankly, if someone doesn't know how to get an article published and doesn't have a collaborator or mentor who does, they probably don't belong publishing in the first place.

    How to analyze your data should be pre-planned when the experiment is designed, so again, not something to be figuring out only as you're trying to prepare a manuscript for publication. If you don't know how to do it yourself, you hire a statistician to help.
     
  8. Nov 20, 2009 #7

    turbo

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    It's not so easy to generalize. Some journals have very stringent requirements regarding formatting, and some will gladly accept papers with text and tables formatted for Microsoft Office.

    As Moonie has explained, most journals are quite specific about their requirements. There are LOTS of journals, and their requirements can change, so it would be a daunting task for a PF denizen to try to keep up with them all.

    BTW, if you want to publish, you not only have to look at formatting requirements - you have to keep an eye on per-page fees and the like. If you're not affiliated with an academic/research program that provides funding to cover such fees, you may have to think twice.
     
  9. Nov 21, 2009 #8

    drizzle

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    It looks like it’s more complicated than I thought. Well, I just thought it would be great to provide guidance on such topics.


    Btw, I still work on my thesis and I don’t plan to publish a paper, and if I do, it’ll be associated with an academic program as you suggested turbo-1… But thanks for concerning.
     
  10. Nov 21, 2009 #9

    ZapperZ

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    I believe that I have addressed some of the issues regarding thesis writing and publishing in the "So You Want To Be A Physicist" essay. While this was aimed at physics majors, the general "theme" should also be applicable to other areas.

    Zz.
     
  11. Nov 21, 2009 #10

    drizzle

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    That's a great guide ZapperZ!... But why not do it all in a subforum that concens only in such topics!


    Ps. Just a thought though, don't shoot me Moonbear :tongue:
     
  12. Nov 21, 2009 #11

    ZapperZ

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    There's nothing to stop someone from doing something similar in all of the subforums related to each of the possible area of studies. Would you like to volunteer?

    See, that's the whole issue that we are dealing with here. Someone has to do the work. It isn't just a matter of creating a special subforum for every single topic that people suggest. It's a matter of whether there is a clear demand for it and enough members who will participate and contribute. Those have to come first, and then the we'll create the subforum for it.

    You'll notice also that I didn't demand a subforum for what I wrote. It simply belongs in an existing Academic Guidance forum. No need for a whole subforum for that topic.

    Zz.
     
  13. Nov 21, 2009 #12

    drizzle

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    :coughed up: huh, okay I get it!

    [hell, now I have to clean my laptop screen…thanks Zz :grumpy:]
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2009
  14. Nov 21, 2009 #13
    In most physics journals, you don't have to bother that much about typesetting. You just submit your LaTeX file and after acceptance, the typesetters will take care of proper formatting. They will send you a proof copy possibly with questions to you about changes they made. You have to submit your corrections to the proof. It is ultimately your version that is published, even if it violates some journal guidelines. Only a page limit will usually be taken serious and things like formatting of references, tables etc. But they won't change your text or formulas if you insist that it be printed in a certain way.

    The formatting of references and tables are changed by the typsetters, so you can just make the tables in any way you like. You typically won't hear the Referee complain about the formatting, that you put the caption of your figures or tables in the wrong place or whatever.
     
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