Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Punctured pipeline

  1. Oct 10, 2011 #1
    Hi,
    I've got punctured pressurized pipeline transporting an oil. Diameter of pipeline is 50 mm and diameter of the hole is only 2 mm. Pressure in the pipeline is 20 bar and pressure outside is atmospherical. The rate of transported oil is 2m3 per hour and I need to estimate released volume of oil, while pump is still working so I have two flows: one through the hole and another one continous in pipeline after the hole.
    Any help will be appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 10, 2011 #2

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Welcome to the PF.

    Is this question for schoolwork?
     
  4. Oct 10, 2011 #3
    No it's not schoolwork.it has happened and I would like to know how much oil has leaked out.
     
  5. Oct 10, 2011 #4

    Q_Goest

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

  6. Oct 11, 2011 #5
    Ok. But I've still got a problem with understanding this: When I've got a hole in a pipe there are two flows (one trough a hole and 2nd in pipe), so the flow through the hole is just a fraction of incoming flow. In equation it should be Qin=Qhole + Qpipe after hole and when I calculate flow through an orifice its just one flow so Qin=Qorifice
    Or am I wrong?
     
  7. Oct 11, 2011 #6

    Q_Goest

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Yes, flow through orifice is a fraction of total flow in. Let's say the flow out the orifice is 2 GPM which equates to 0.45 cubic meters per hour. If you have a flow of only 2.00 cubic meters per hour before the orifice, you only have a flow of 1.55 cubic meters after the orifice.
     
  8. Oct 11, 2011 #7
    Ok.
    I've found another equation to estimate leakage amount through small holes in a pipeline. It says:
    Q=0.61A(2gh)^0.5

    where
    Q is flow in cu. ft./second
    A is cross sectional area, sq. ft.
    g is gravitational constant, ft/sec^2
    h is head, feet
    It looks like this is the right equation for me. Problem is, I dont know what is head or how can I calculate. Any help?
     
  9. Oct 11, 2011 #8

    Q_Goest

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Punctured pipeline
  1. Pipeline To Space? (Replies: 42)

Loading...