Purpose of Net Ionic Equations

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In summary, net ionic equations can be useful for determining which elements were oxidized or reduced, as well as for observing ionic precipitations and dissociations.
  • #1
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Is the only purpose of net ionic equations to see which elements were oxidized or reduced? Or is there another reason why it is useful?
 
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  • #2
Personally, I don't want to write down all the spectator ions all the time. It just saves time and effort not to write down things that don't react at all.
 
  • #3
They helps concentrate on what is really happening.

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  • #4
But in neutralization reactions for example, a lot of the time you're just going to get H2O->(H+)+(OH-). The ions that make up the salt cancel out and now you're left with only the dissociation of water. I still consider what happens to those ions important... I don't see any benefit in just seeing water in the equation. So when would a net ionic equation help? You can't say that you see what's really happening, because a salt is being made in this reaction and you wouldn't know by the given equation.
 
  • #5
gsingh2011 said:
I still consider what happens to those ions important...

And what have happened to them? Nothing. They were freely flowing in the solution and they are freely flowing in the solution. Changes to the solution properties have their source in neutralization reaction.

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  • #6
Borek,

You're saying that ions are "free" but many books say they are hydrated. They are quite neutralized.
 
  • #7
Yes, they are hydrated - but as hydrated they are freely moving in the solution. That is not changing regardless of what have happened to OH- and H+.

If we want to get deeper into details we can also differentiate between ions that get hydrated just because they are charged and water molecules are diploes, and those that are complexed by water molecules and surrounded by more or less ordered water dipoles later. Regardless of which model applies, I treat such an ion as a free one, even if technically its description can be quite complicated.

No iodea what you mean by "they are neutralized".

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  • #8
An hydrated ion (charged) has a water armor around it.
Thus the charge is made farer from any other ion. Its charge is lowered by this distance and electrostatic bond.
Its motion may be slowed (Na+, Ca++) or quite favored (K+).
It is the famous Hoffmeister series.
 

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  • #9
Charge is not lowered, if anything, it is screened. And yes, water presence has many effects on what is happening in the solution. Is it in any way related to the original question about net ionic equations?

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  • #10
Borek,
An elestrostatic bond of any kind is a charge sharing. A share is a share. Then this shared part becomes unavailable for other ions. That is the lowering I'm talking.
 
  • #11
How is it realated to the original question? If your plan was to confuse OP you already succeded. EOT.
 
  • #12
Borek said:
They helps concentrate on what is really happening.
Sorry for the confusion. You were talking about another kind of reality?
 
  • #13
gsingh2011 said:
Is the only purpose of net ionic equations to see which elements were oxidized or reduced? Or is there another reason why it is useful?

A net ionic reaction will also show you when ions form a crystal lattice and precipitate out of solution.

It also shows when a covalent molecule dissociates into ions. [tex]NH_{3}+H_{2}O \rightleftharpoons NH_{4}^{+}+OH^{-}[/tex]

(or better) [tex]NH_{3}+H_{2}O +CO_{2} \rightleftharpoons NH_{4}^{+}+HCO_{3}^{-}[/tex]
 
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1. What is the purpose of net ionic equations?

The purpose of net ionic equations is to show the specific chemical reactions that occur between substances in a solution. This type of equation helps to simplify and focus on only the essential components of a reaction, making it easier to understand and analyze.

2. How do you write a net ionic equation?

To write a net ionic equation, you must first start with a balanced molecular equation, which shows all of the substances involved in the reaction. Then, you can identify and cancel out any spectator ions that do not participate in the reaction. Finally, write the remaining substances as ions to create the net ionic equation.

3. Why do we need to write net ionic equations?

Net ionic equations are necessary because they allow us to see the specific substances that are reacting and the products that are formed. This information is crucial for understanding chemical reactions and predicting the outcomes of different reactions.

4. What is the difference between a net ionic equation and a complete ionic equation?

A complete ionic equation includes all of the ions present in a reaction, including spectator ions. A net ionic equation, on the other hand, only includes the essential ions that participate in the reaction and cancels out spectator ions. This makes the net ionic equation more concise and focused on the actual chemical reaction.

5. Can net ionic equations be used in all types of reactions?

Net ionic equations can be used for reactions that occur in aqueous solutions, such as acid-base reactions and precipitation reactions. They cannot be used for reactions that occur in the gas phase or in non-aqueous solutions. In these cases, a different type of equation, such as a molecular equation, may be more appropriate.

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