Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Purslane anybody?

  1. Jul 15, 2011 #1

    Q_Goest

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    I just read an interesting article suggesting eating purslane in salads. I never heard of it before so I looked it up. Here's a few pictures, see if you recognize it:
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi

    If you're like me, you will readily recognize this stuff. It's a weed I have growing in my yard all over. As hard as I try to kill it by pulling it up and spraying, it always comes back. And not just the occasional sprout either. It's the rabbit of the weed world, prolific and able to grow in any kind of nasty soil. It grows in abundance where my dogs pee and the grass dies. It grows on a rocky hill in my front yard where even dandelions can't grab root. And according to what I've read, it's both delicious and nutritious!
    http://web.extension.illinois.edu/cfiv/homeowners/030726.html

    Ok, I'm going home tonight and drop some in my salad. So who else has tried thist stuff and what do you think? Have any good recipies simple enough for an engineer to make?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 15, 2011 #2
    Hmmm. Never heard of it, but now I'm going to keep my eyes open for it. It's kind of amazing to find out that something that grows anywhere without cultivation is good for you.
     
  4. Jul 15, 2011 #3

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I'm familiar with purslane, but never considered eating it due to lawn chemicals and the fact that animals pee and poo all over it. But you said you have some growing on a rocky hill that's most likely not contaminated.

    Let us know if you like it.
     
  5. Jul 15, 2011 #4

    rhody

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Evo,

    You read my mind.

    Q,

    Please report back if after consuming it, anything strange happens.

    Rhody... :redface:
     
  6. Jul 15, 2011 #5

    Q_Goest

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Well, it ain't bad. Tastes a bit like Romain lettuce perhaps. It's a bit crunchy like lettuce and has a similar taste. Not a strong flavor (peppery herb) as I read in http://shine.yahoo.com/event/vitality/the-3-veggies-with-the-least-nutritional-value-2510765/", but then they were comparing it to cucumbers.

    I sent an email to family and friends and my dad wrote back that he's been eating it for 10 years now because of its high omega 3 fatty acid content. Who knew...

    Other weeds to try that are good in salad include dandelion leaves which is a bit bitter and the roots of Queen Anne’s Lace which tastes a bit like carrots but more chewy.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  7. Jul 15, 2011 #6

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I've been trying to control this crap for years. Tilling it doesn't work as the root nodules just get spread. I finally used Round Up but I still get some.

    Eat it? No way when you can have the good stuff in your garden.
     
  8. Jul 15, 2011 #7
    I don't have a garden and I'm glad to know there's something to snack on growing everywhere if the coming zombie apocalypse interrupts food supplies.
     
  9. Jul 15, 2011 #8

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Good point. Now if I can only keep it confined to 25 ft2 area.
     
  10. Jul 15, 2011 #9

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Just let the nature nuts know you have "organic purslane", the lealthy natural herb/vegetable, come pick their own for $10 a pint. Talk to Roger the *spiritual* hen for free.
     
  11. Jul 16, 2011 #10
    I know Roger. Bit of a crank if you ask me.
     
  12. Jul 16, 2011 #11

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Hey, that's MY hen!!
     
  13. Jul 16, 2011 #12

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    In college, the organist in my band was a horticulture major. He was also a fan of Euell Gibbons (remember him?) and loved collecting and eating wild food. He'd bend my ear off about what was good to eat and how to prepare it. We sometimes had "interesting" salads when we'd get together for a meal. Having grown up harvesting young dandelion greens and fiddleheads, I was no stranger to the "wild food" concept, but other friends were not real enthusiastic about eating stuff that we had picked from vacant lots or fields around the campus.
     
  14. Jul 17, 2011 #13

    Ouabache

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I have been familiar with purslane (Portulaca oleracea) as a wild edible for some time;
    so are cattails (Typha spp.), day lily buds (Hemerocallis fulva), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus),
    lambsquarter (Chenopodium album) and shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris).
    Greens have milder flavor when eaten at young stage rather than when mature.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2011
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Purslane anybody?
  1. Shavers anybody? (Replies: 35)

  2. Anybody Norwegien? (Replies: 5)

  3. Does Anybody .? (Replies: 5)

Loading...