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Pyrathane questions.

  1. Jan 29, 2006 #1
    Does anyone here know how Pyrathane stands up to petroleum products? Specifically, how does it react to creosote? Will creosote eventually break it down?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 30, 2006 #2

    FredGarvin

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    After doing a quick search, I didn't see any kind of a chemical compatability listing anywhere. You'll probably have to give the manufacturer a call.
     
  4. Jan 30, 2006 #3

    Q_Goest

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    I have "Chemical Resistance Guide for Elastomers II" on my desk, and it says polyurethane (which I'm assuming is very close to Pyrathane) will be attacked to some degree by creosote and shouldn't be used. The book recommends Nitrile, Fluorocarbon, and Fluorosilicone.
     
  5. Jan 30, 2006 #4
    Thanks Q. I'm getting some conflicting stories from other sources. If anyone else has any information on this feel free to come forward. As far as I can tell, pyrathane is a trade name for polyurethane or something very close to it manufactured by the company Pyramid. I have not heard back directly from Pyramid yet.
     
  6. Jan 30, 2006 #5

    Q_Goest

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    I have another reference, this one from "Minor Rubber Company". They rate it as "minor to moderate effect" and they also recommend Fluorosilicone. They rate nitrile as minor to moderate effect also.
     
  7. Jan 30, 2006 #6
    Ok thanks again Q. Still waiting to hear from Pyramid. I did some searching last night on-line and came up with the same results as Fred.
     
  8. Jan 30, 2006 #7

    FredGarvin

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    We use fluorosilicone for our standard applications around jet fuels.
     
  9. Jan 30, 2006 #8
    Ok Fred. Thanks. Creosote is a coal or wood product so I'm not sure how similar it would be with what is basically kerosene.
     
  10. Jan 31, 2006 #9

    FredGarvin

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    I always thought that creosote could be a by product of combustion. I must be thinking of something else...
     
  11. Jan 31, 2006 #10
    Creosote IS found in chimneys specifically where wood is burned. Do a little more googling and you'll find out how.
     
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