QM hidden variables, the existence of the past, etc

In summary, there is a lot of discussion about free will and the possibility that the laws of physics may change in the future.
  • #1
Kirk Gregory Czuhai
34
0
and throughout all this I get the "feeling" that most of you just expect that the "laws" of physics, (whatever they ARE) will remain unchanged thoughout the future!

This of course cannot be assumed!

Time, space, matter, of ALL types could very well come to an END in the NEXT SECOND! Can anybody PROVE me wrong?

love and peace,
and,
peace and love,
(kirk) kirk gregory czuhai
p.s. omg!, i hope NOT!
http://www.altelco.net/~churches/BlueRoses.htm
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
of course not! just like no one could prove beyond all doubt that the past absoultely occurred just as anyONE would "INTERPRET" it.

Thus since the enviorment, or even the physics of the past, (as interpreted) by each individual will be at least slightly different for each person, it can be expected that this will influence the judgements of interpretations of the physics experiments in whatever future "experiments" the two or more people conduct in the future.

Actually to answer what "exactly" what is meant by "free will" would be better left to the Philosophy section of Physics Forums and would of course entail religious aspects for many so is not appropriate to discuss in depth here.

However as far as the "physics" is concerned, a person, can consciously make decisions early that will influence his later decisions so in this sense he/she has free will to chose in a physics sense how his future will be. I suppose in some sense this could be considered in some sense a non-locality of space time! OR EVEN TIME TRAVEL?
what does anybody think of this?
love and peace,
and,
peace and love,
(kirk) kirk gregory czuhai
p.s.
i have the bad habbit of typing urls that have nothing to do with topics under discussion and i am sorry for that. morbid sense of humor i guess. i will try harder to stop this. BUT ELECTRON DECAY? well! i am an emotional guy. i get carried away at times and get EXCITED by INTERESTING THINGS!
 
  • #3
Kirk Gregory Czuhai said:
and throughout all this I get the "feeling" that most of you just expect that the "laws" of physics, (whatever they ARE) will remain unchanged thoughout the future!

This of course cannot be assumed!

Time, space, matter, of ALL types could very well come to an END in the NEXT SECOND! Can anybody PROVE me wrong?

love and peace,
and,
peace and love,
(kirk) kirk gregory czuhai
p.s. omg!, i hope NOT!
http://www.altelco.net/~churches/BlueRoses.htm
Kirk, these are good questions ... but the appropriate place to discuss them is the Philosophy section of PF - specifically, the philosophy of science.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #4
Here is the thread that this was split from

Oops! This post of mine should be at the start of this thread (sorry that it's not so easy to follow).

Here is the thread that these posts were split from ...
 

1. What are hidden variables in quantum mechanics?

Hidden variables in quantum mechanics refer to theoretical quantities that are not directly observable, but are believed to determine the outcome of quantum events. These variables are proposed in attempts to explain the probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics and the apparent randomness of quantum events.

2. Can hidden variables explain the existence of the past in quantum mechanics?

The existence of the past in quantum mechanics is a philosophical concept related to the measurement problem. While some theories propose that hidden variables can explain the existence of the past, this is still a subject of debate and has not been proven conclusively.

3. How do scientists study hidden variables in quantum mechanics?

Most studies on hidden variables in quantum mechanics are theoretical and involve mathematical models and simulations. Experiments are also conducted, but they are limited by the uncertainty principle and other fundamental principles of quantum mechanics.

4. Are there any theories that reject the existence of hidden variables?

Yes, there are some interpretations of quantum mechanics, such as the Copenhagen interpretation, that reject the existence of hidden variables. These interpretations propose that quantum events are inherently probabilistic and cannot be explained by hidden variables.

5. What implications do hidden variables have for our understanding of reality?

The existence and role of hidden variables in quantum mechanics have significant implications for our understanding of reality. If they exist, they would suggest that there are underlying determinants of quantum events, which could have implications for free will and the nature of the universe. However, the lack of conclusive evidence for their existence leaves these implications open to debate.

Similar threads

Replies
80
Views
3K
  • Quantum Interpretations and Foundations
2
Replies
45
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
3
Replies
101
Views
8K
  • General Discussion
2
Replies
65
Views
11K
Replies
15
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Quantum Physics
2
Replies
39
Views
9K
  • Quantum Interpretations and Foundations
Replies
25
Views
943
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
12
Views
4K
Back
Top