Quantum Effects in MOSFET

In summary, we discussed the concept of strong inversion in MOSFETs and how it traps electrons in the lowest energy subbands. We also looked at the Van Dort model, which takes into account the increased energy bandgap in the inversion region, leading to a higher intrinsic carrier density. Despite the reduced density of states in the subbands, the high energy bandgap still results in a high amount of charge according to the formula.
  • #1
kpsr
11
0
Hello to all !

In MOSFET at strong inversion electrons confined to triangular quantum well, electrons occupy only 1 or 2 lowest subbands.
and the Van Dort model gives the quantum mechanical intrinsic carrier density in inversion channel via increased energy band-gap(ΔE).
NQM = NCL× Exp(-ΔE/2kt) this carrier amount is very high.
But density of states for inversion charges in subbads reduced from the higher 3-D density to the lower 2-D density.

Then still HOW the above Van Dort's formula giving that high amount of charge..?

Thank You.
 
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  • #2


Hello there,

Thank you for bringing up this interesting topic in MOSFETs and the Van Dort model. I would like to provide some insights and explanation to your question.

Firstly, let's understand the concept of strong inversion in MOSFETs. In strong inversion, the gate voltage is high enough to create a triangular quantum well in the channel region of the MOSFET. This well traps the electrons, making them confined to the lowest energy subbands. This is due to the potential energy barrier created by the gate voltage, which restricts the electrons to stay in the lower subbands.

Now, let's move on to the Van Dort model. This model takes into account the increased energy bandgap (ΔE) in the inversion region of the MOSFET. This increased energy bandgap is a result of the gate voltage, which creates a higher potential energy barrier for the electrons. This leads to a higher intrinsic carrier density (NQM) in the inversion channel, as shown in the formula you mentioned.

However, it is important to note that the density of states for inversion charges in the subbands is reduced from the higher 3-D density to the lower 2-D density. This means that the number of available energy states for the electrons is reduced, but the energy bandgap is still high. This results in a higher intrinsic carrier density in the inversion channel.

In conclusion, the Van Dort model takes into account the increased energy bandgap in the inversion region, which leads to a higher intrinsic carrier density. Even though the density of states is reduced in the subbands, the energy bandgap is still high, resulting in a high amount of charge according to the formula. I hope this helps clarify your question.

Thank you.
 

Related to Quantum Effects in MOSFET

1. What is a MOSFET?

A MOSFET (Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor) is a type of transistor used in electronic devices, including computers and smartphones. It is used to amplify or switch electronic signals.

2. What are quantum effects in MOSFETs?

Quantum effects in MOSFETs refer to the behavior of electrons at the quantum level, which can affect the performance and operation of the transistor. These effects become more prominent as transistors continue to shrink in size.

3. How do quantum effects impact MOSFET performance?

Quantum effects can lead to variations in the transistor's behavior, such as increased leakage current and reduced switching speed. These variations can affect the accuracy and reliability of the device.

4. What measures can be taken to mitigate quantum effects in MOSFETs?

There are several techniques used to reduce the impact of quantum effects, such as using different materials for the transistor's components, designing the transistor in a specific way, and implementing error correction algorithms.

5. What are the future implications of quantum effects in MOSFET technology?

As transistors continue to shrink in size, quantum effects will become more prevalent and could potentially limit the advancement of MOSFET technology. Researchers are currently exploring alternative transistor designs and materials to overcome these limitations.

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