Quantum waves seen in molecules

  • #1

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In 1999, Zeilinger and his colleagues fired beams of "carbon-60" or "carbon-70" molecules (so named because each molecule contains 60 or 70 carbon atoms) at a device called a diffraction grating. The individual molecules spread out in wavelike patterns, creating "interference patterns" visible on a monitor. This proved that even very hefty molecules can experience quantum effects -- and, thus, can literally be in more than one place at a time, crazy though this sounds.

-http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/02/22/QUANTUM.TMP&type=science [Broken]
 
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  • #2
ZapperZ
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Originally posted by brain pickeR
In 1999, Zeilinger and his colleagues fired beams of "carbon-60" or "carbon-70" molecules (so named because each molecule contains 60 or 70 carbon atoms) at a device called a diffraction grating. The individual molecules spread out in wavelike patterns, creating "interference patterns" visible on a monitor. This proved that even very hefty molecules can experience quantum effects -- and, thus, can literally be in more than one place at a time, crazy though this sounds.

-http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/02/22/QUANTUM.TMP&type=science [Broken]
I think you are about 4 years behind. The Zeilinger's group has gone on to publish a few more of these, the most recent one being the observation of wave-like nature in tetraphenylporphyrin and fluorofullerene.[1] These are at least twice as big as C70 molecules. They currently hold the record in terms of size and mass.

Zz.

[1] L. Hackermüller et al., PRL v.91, p.090408 (2003).
 
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