Quark Stars?

  • #1

Summary:

Proton decay and Hexaquarks and Quark Stars. Anti-Hexaquark; Matter to Antimatter dilemma.

Main Question or Discussion Point

Question:

Is it believed a "quark star" exists within all neutron stars, or just heavier neutron stars.

Do protons actually decay under this pressure (quark soup)?

Are Hexaquark bosons able to remain stable beyond the limit of a proton, or would they decay at the same time of a regular triquark boson?

During a neutron star collision, is there a predicted net gain in Hexaquarks and net loss of standard matter?

Final question: How would anti-hexaquarks react to normal tri-quark matter? Are anti-hexaquarks even likely to interact with the a regular hexaquarks unless forced together (such a darkmatter star). Would we even be able to tell the difference between a Hexaquark star and an Anti-Hexaquark star?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
mathman
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1} Core of neutron stars is a current research question.
2) Protons are long gone. They were compressed with electrons during neutron star formation.

I have no idea what would happen to hexaquarks under these conditions, but I doubt if they could exist.
 
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  • #3
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The interior composition of neutron stars is unclear.
Do protons actually decay under this pressure (quark soup)?
They don't decay, they combine with electrons to neutrons.
Are Hexaquark bosons able to remain stable beyond the limit of a proton, or would they decay at the same time of a regular triquark boson?
We don't know any hexaquarks (if you don't count the deuteron), it's unclear if they exist and what their properties are if they do. If they are at a low energy they might exist in neutron stars, but why didn't we see them in accelerators then?
Final question: How would anti-hexaquarks react to normal tri-quark matter?
I don't see conditions where both could exist at the same time.
such a darkmatter star
What is that supposed to be?
 
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  • #5
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Notice how things get progressively worse from the publication to that article?

There is something that has 6 valence quarks. It might simply be a state of two baryons together, we don't know. That's the publication. The press release then speculates based on that, and the space.com article speculates even more based on the press release. And it's pretty obscure speculation.
And the last step is your post here, because there is no "darkmatter star" in any of these previous steps.
 
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  • #6
Notice how things get progressively worse from the publication to that article?

There is something that has 6 valence quarks. It might simply be a state of two baryons together, we don't know. That's the publication. The press release then speculates based on that, and the space.com article speculates even more based on the press release. And it's pretty obscure speculation.
And the last step is your post here, because there is no "darkmatter star" in any of these previous steps.
No. I'm not an expert like you, that's why I come here to ask the experts questions.

If us uninformed peons knew the answers, we wouldn't come here to ask.
 
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