Quasar images

  • #1
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I saw a real image of a quasar bursting out gamma radiation on a science channel program and I am having trouble finding the image, or any like it on the internet. All I can find are CG rendered things, and IR/UV images. The photo that I am referring to looked a bit like the hubble deep field photos, but it had a giant blue beam coming through it towards the camera. You could not miss it.

Is there some specific keyword I should be using to search for this?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Drakkith
Staff Emeritus
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I tried on google for a few minutes but didn't see anything like what you are describing. I would be interested in seeing it as well. What was the show you watched called?
 
  • #3
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It was called "How the universe works" (Narrated by Mike Rowe). The episode on black holes had what they claimed was (and what looked like) a real image of the gamma beam. I just wanted to see more images like it, it was impressive albeit low-res.
 
  • #4
ideasrule
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The relativistic jet from M87? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:M87_jet.jpg

If so, that's not a quasar; it's just an ordinary active galactic nucleus. M87 is only 50 million light years away, whereas the nearest quasar is at 2 billion ly.
 
  • #5
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That is indeed the picture! Thanks. They clearly stated that it was the gamma burst from a quasar in the program.:eek: But they were also talking about black holes and whatnot. I'm going to have to re-watch that, clearly I misunderstood what they said.
 
  • #6
ideasrule
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That is indeed the picture! Thanks. They clearly stated that it was the gamma burst from a quasar in the program.:eek: But they were also talking about black holes and whatnot. I'm going to have to re-watch that, clearly I misunderstood what they said.
It wouldn't surprise me if the program got the facts completely wrong. The first problem is that M87 is not a quasar. The second is that gamma ray bursts look nothing like relativistic jets. They're so distant, and caused by objects so small in extent (namely supernovae and binary neutron star mergers) that the best conceivable telescopes can't reveal them as more than a point. The third problem is that gamma ray bursts emit gamma rays, which Hubble doesn't have the capability to detect.
 

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