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Quasar without a host galaxy

  1. Nov 15, 2005 #1

    turbo

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    The post that held the link to this paper has been moved. I would like to see comments on this paper, including impressions of the mechanism responsible for the interaction of the quasar and the associated galaxy.

    http://arxiv.org/ftp/astro-ph/papers/0509/0509433.pdf

    I objected to the interpretation of "collision" as the source of the interaction and suggested ejection, and a couple of minutes before I hit the submit button, EL came up with a link to this paper.

    http://www.arxiv.org/PS_cache/astro-ph/pdf/0511/0511245.pdf

    Are we seeing a creation event?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 16, 2005 #2

    Chronos

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    Unclear on the meaning of a creation event. There are several apparent possibilities, including the merger-ejection scenario suggested by Haehnelt et al.
     
  4. Nov 19, 2005 #3

    turbo

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    Creation event, as in the quasar was ejected from the host and may evolve into an object that does not have the same apparent properties (redshift included). Please Google "radiation recoil" or "Slingshot" along wth the term "black hole" to see where the current publications are headed.
     
  5. Nov 21, 2005 #4

    Chronos

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    Simple questions remain unanswered...If quasars are ejection events, where are all the ones that should have been ejected directly at us? Not a single, compelling example exists, and there should be thousands of them.
     
  6. Nov 21, 2005 #5

    turbo

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    I pointed out this example some time back, and your response was something to the effect that it wasn't a good example because the quasar is not superimposed directly of the galaxy's nucleus. Unfortunately, quasars are not all that easy to detect, and if this one were superimposed directly over the nucleus of the galaxy, it would likely never have been detected at all.

    http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/physics_astronomy/report-38639.html

    As for the "directly at us" question, some people have asked "where are the blueshifted quasars?", so I'll address that right now. The Burbidges, Arp, et al contend that quasars have intrinsic red shifts that moderate over time. Nowhere in their work is there a contention that this intrinsic redshift is a doppler effect attributable to the motion of the quasar. The contributions to the total redshift of a quasar are 1) intrinsic (and moderating as the quasar matures) in addition to 2) the redshift appropriate to the quasar's cosmological distance from us, and 3) the redshift or blueshift (+or- adjustment) arising from the quasar's motion through space (away from us, toward us, etc).
     
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