Quasars with high redshift in nearby galaxies

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bcrowell
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In one I've recently looked at, even the title supports it: arXiv:0812.3130v1 "The Peculiar Shape of the [itex]\beta_{ app} − z[/itex] Distribution Seen in Radio Loud AGN Jets Is Explained Simply and Naturally In the Local Quasar Model".
As far as I can tell from the arxiv page and the pdf, this paper hasn't been published in a peer-reviewed journal. I have no technical expertise in observational astronomy, but the fact that it was posted in 2008 and never published suggests that it's an incorrect paper that failed to make it through peer review. Please note that according to the PF rules:
It is against our Posting Guidelines to discuss, in most of the PF forums or in blogs, new or non-mainstream theories or ideas that have not been published in professional peer-reviewed journals or are not part of current professional mainstream scientific discussion.
Can you provide any support for your claims from anything that has passed peer review?

However, this has always been consistent with Arp's original observation, which is that quasars closest to the host galaxy have high intrinsic redshifts and a point-like appearance, or unresolved nebulosity, but quasars further away have much smaller intrinsic redshifts and appear more like galaxies with active nuclei.
You refer to the "observation" that there are "intrinsic redshifts." The use of the word "observation" might mislead folks into thinking that the existence of "intrinsic redshifts" has actually been verified observationally in a way that is accepted as objectively reliable by people in the field. This is not the case. Claims of "intrinsic redshifts" are crackpot material.

Explaining intrinsic redshift is very difficult, and current attempts are far too speculative to discuss here.
Again there is a problem with your use of language. When you say "Explaining intrinsic redshift" you make it sound as though there is an objectively established phenomenon, which then requires explanation. The overwhelming consensus in the field is that there is no such thing as an "intrinsic redshift."

-Ben
 
George Jones
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Since this thread has run its course and is veering into the highly speculative and non-mainstream, it is now closed.

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Overly Speculative Posts: One of the main goals of PF is to help students learn the current status of physics as practiced by the scientific community; accordingly, Physicsforums.com strives to maintain high standards of academic integrity. There are many open questions in physics, and we welcome discussion on those subjects provided the discussion remains intellectually sound. It is against our Posting Guidelines to discuss, in most of the PF forums or in blogs, new or non-mainstream theories or ideas that have not been published in professional peer-reviewed journals or are not part of current professional mainstream scientific discussion.
 

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