Question About Background for Quantum Mechanics/Computing

  • Thread starter oobob
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Quantum
In summary: I have a copy myself and it should serve you well.In summary, the conversation is about someone looking for book recommendations to help fill in their background knowledge on quantum information theory. They have already taken several math courses, including matrix theory, but are lacking understanding in Hilbert spaces and tensors. They are interested in finding graduate level texts, but are open to alternatives if necessary. One recommendation given is Nielsen Cheung, which the person recommending also has a copy of and believes will be helpful.
  • #1
2
0
Greetings. I'm working on something that requires I read a large paper on quantum information theory and I was wondering if anyone could recommend some books that could help fill in my background. To be specific, I'm reading Keyl's Fundamentals of Quantum Information Theory paper. I have until fall before I technically have to even start reading this, although I would prefer to start sooner.

I just finished a course on matrix theory and so I possesses some understanding of the beginning of the paper, but it soon introduces Hilbert spaces and tensors, two things I know nothing about. I'm interested on finding books that explain Hilbert spaces and tensors, and also the name of a good intro to quantum mechanics that I could refer to as a secondary text.

For my background, I've taken the first abstract algebra and analysis courses, linear algebra, matrix theory, and calc III. Since I'll be taking graduate level algebra and analysis courses this fall, I can learn any necessary material from them as may be required in a suggested book. In terms of what I know of matrices, I've read the fundamental parts (not applications) of Horn and Johnson's Matrix Analysis.

I think I would prefer graduate level texts, but if none of them are adequate for someone in my position, alternatives would be appreciated.

Thanks,
-Oobob
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
oobob said:
Greetings. I'm working on something that requires I read a large paper on quantum information theory and I was wondering if anyone could recommend some books that could help fill in my background. To be specific, I'm reading Keyl's Fundamentals of Quantum Information Theory paper. I have until fall before I technically have to even start reading this, although I would prefer to start sooner.

I just finished a course on matrix theory and so I possesses some understanding of the beginning of the paper, but it soon introduces Hilbert spaces and tensors, two things I know nothing about. I'm interested on finding books that explain Hilbert spaces and tensors, and also the name of a good intro to quantum mechanics that I could refer to as a secondary text.

For my background, I've taken the first abstract algebra and analysis courses, linear algebra, matrix theory, and calc III. Since I'll be taking graduate level algebra and analysis courses this fall, I can learn any necessary material from them as may be required in a suggested book. In terms of what I know of matrices, I've read the fundamental parts (not applications) of Horn and Johnson's Matrix Analysis.

I think I would prefer graduate level texts, but if none of them are adequate for someone in my position, alternatives would be appreciated.

Thanks,
-Oobob

Grab your self a copy of Nielsen Cheung it is a very good book.
 
  • #3


Hello Oobob,

Thank you for reaching out and sharing your question with us. It sounds like you have a solid background in mathematics, which will definitely be helpful in understanding quantum information theory. Here are some recommendations for books that could help fill in your background and provide a good foundation for reading Keyl's paper:

1. "Quantum Computing since Democritus" by Scott Aaronson - This book provides a great introduction to quantum computing and includes a chapter on quantum information theory. It also covers topics such as Hilbert spaces and tensors in an accessible way.

2. "Quantum Computation and Quantum Information" by Michael Nielsen and Isaac Chuang - This is a standard textbook in the field and covers all the basics of quantum computing and information theory. It is a bit more technical than Aaronson's book, but it may be helpful for your purposes.

3. "Quantum Mechanics: The Theoretical Minimum" by Leonard Susskind and Art Friedman - This book covers the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and could serve as a good secondary text for you. It is less focused on quantum information theory, but it will provide a solid understanding of the underlying principles.

In addition to these books, you may also want to look into online resources such as lectures or tutorials that cover topics like Hilbert spaces and tensors in the context of quantum mechanics. It may also be helpful to consult with your professors or classmates who have more experience in this area.

I hope these suggestions are helpful and wish you the best of luck in your studies. Quantum information theory is a fascinating and rapidly growing field, and I'm sure you will find it rewarding to dive into it. Happy reading!
 

1. What is the background for quantum mechanics/computing?

Quantum mechanics/computing is a field of study that combines principles from quantum mechanics and computer science to develop new methods for processing and storing information. It relies on the laws of quantum mechanics, which govern the behavior of subatomic particles, to perform calculations and solve complex problems at a much faster rate than classical computing.

2. What are the applications of quantum mechanics/computing?

The applications of quantum mechanics/computing are vast and diverse. They range from improving cybersecurity and data encryption to simulating chemical reactions and optimizing financial transactions. Quantum computing also has the potential to revolutionize industries such as healthcare, energy, and transportation.

3. How does quantum mechanics/computing differ from classical computing?

Quantum mechanics/computing differs from classical computing in its underlying principles and computational methods. Classical computing uses binary bits (0s and 1s) to process and store information, while quantum computing uses quantum bits (qubits) that can exist in multiple states simultaneously. This allows quantum computers to perform calculations and solve problems that would take classical computers an impractically long time.

4. What are the challenges in developing quantum mechanics/computing?

One of the main challenges in developing quantum mechanics/computing is the fragility of qubits. Any external interference can cause them to lose their quantum state, leading to errors in calculations. Another challenge is the difficulty in scaling up quantum systems to handle larger and more complex problems. Additionally, the technology and materials needed for quantum computing are still in their early stages and require significant advancements.

5. What is the current state of quantum mechanics/computing?

Quantum mechanics/computing is a rapidly advancing field, and there have been significant breakthroughs in recent years. Several tech companies and research institutions have developed small-scale quantum computers, and there are ongoing efforts to improve their capabilities and increase the number of qubits. However, quantum computing is still in its early stages, and there is much research and development needed before it becomes a widespread technology.

Suggested for: Question About Background for Quantum Mechanics/Computing

Replies
35
Views
853
Replies
3
Views
965
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
7
Views
896
Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
7
Views
1K
Back
Top