Question about claiming a new theory to be yours?

  • Thread starter zeromodz
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Theory
In summary, the individual is seeking advice on how to share a philosophical theory they have come up with at the age of 17. They are wondering how to publish it or claim ownership. The response suggests researching to ensure the idea is original and then emailing it to appropriate journals, as the paper will have their name and email address on it. Claiming ownership should not be an issue.
  • #1
zeromodz
246
0
I didn't know where else to post this, but anyways. Say if I were to come up with a theory, not really a scientific theory, more philosophical and I want to announce it to the public or publish it in a magazine. How would I do this, how could I claim the idea to be mine. I am only 17. Thanks:)
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Well first you'll want to research to make sure the idea hasn't been thought of before. But after that - just email it to the appropriate journals. Making the claim of ownership isn't really an issue, as the paper will have your name on it and will come from your email address!
 
  • #3


I understand the excitement and passion that comes with developing a new theory. However, it is important to remember that scientific theories are based on empirical evidence and undergo rigorous testing and peer review before being accepted by the scientific community. Therefore, it is not enough to simply claim an idea as your own.

If you have developed a philosophical theory, it is important to first thoroughly research and understand existing theories and literature in the field. This will allow you to properly contextualize and articulate your own theory. Additionally, you may want to seek feedback and critiques from other experts in the field to strengthen your ideas and address any potential flaws.

When it comes to claiming ownership of a theory, it is important to properly cite and give credit to any sources or influences that have contributed to your thinking. This not only shows integrity, but also allows others to trace the development of your theory.

If you wish to share your theory with the public, you can do so through various avenues such as publishing in a magazine or presenting at a conference. However, it is important to remember that your theory should be presented as a hypothesis or proposal, rather than a definitive truth. This allows for open discussion and further exploration of your ideas.

Lastly, age should not be a barrier to sharing your ideas and theories. As long as you have put in the effort to develop and support your theory, your age should not diminish its value. I encourage you to continue exploring and developing your ideas, and to always be open to constructive criticism and further learning.
 

Related to Question about claiming a new theory to be yours?

1. Can I claim a new theory to be mine?

Technically, you can claim a new theory to be yours, but it is important to give credit to the sources and individuals who have contributed to the development of the theory. It is also crucial to provide evidence and support for the theory in order to establish its validity.

2. What steps should I take to claim a new theory as mine?

First, you should thoroughly research the existing literature to make sure that the theory is truly original. Then, gather evidence and data to support your theory and present it at conferences or in scientific journals. It is also important to cite your sources and give credit to others who have contributed to the development of the theory.

3. Is it necessary to have a formal education or degree to claim a new theory as mine?

No, a formal education or degree is not necessary to claim a new theory as yours. However, having a strong background in the relevant field and knowledge of the scientific method can greatly support your claim.

4. What are the potential consequences of falsely claiming a new theory to be mine?

Falsely claiming a new theory as yours can damage your credibility and reputation in the scientific community. It can also lead to legal implications, such as plagiarism or intellectual property infringement.

5. What should I do if someone else claims my theory as their own?

If someone else claims your theory as their own, it is important to gather evidence and documentation to support your claim of ownership. You can also seek legal advice and reach out to the scientific community to defend your rights as the creator of the theory.

Similar threads

  • General Discussion
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
25
Views
521
  • General Discussion
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
16
Views
1K
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
14
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
1
Views
716
  • General Discussion
Replies
4
Views
882
  • General Discussion
Replies
17
Views
2K
Back
Top