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Question about STEM courses

  1. Dec 3, 2015 #1
    I am a major in liberal arts and science ( or at least still trying to decide on which STEM field i will be going in ) and right now i am going to take intro science courses (general biology 1 and 2, chemistry 1 and 2, physics 1 and 2) and also math courses. After i am done with the intro courses, what comes after those courses (what goes after biology what goes after chemistry, physics). Also i know for math there is the calculus sequences, linear algebra, differential equations, but after that what goes after that? It's a huge course load, but I have a huge interest in mostly biology and physics, but its a pain having to take all those math and chemistry courses since bio needs chem knowledge and physics needs math knowledge. Any advice in order for me not to stress out.
     
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  3. Dec 3, 2015 #2

    jtbell

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    Doesn't your college or university list their recommended course sequences for those majors on their web site?
     
  4. Dec 3, 2015 #3

    symbolipoint

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    What you list for Mathematics courses is usually the minimum or typical requirements for nearly every Science Technology Engineering Mathematics field. Those courses are necessary for studying any STEM field beyond the introductory courses. While you study the sequence of Mathematics courses, you also should do some of the lower level science course while you decide which main or major science or engineering direction to take.

    Be a little more careful with figuring which science courses are necessary for understanding which other science courses. Physics informs engineering and chemistry; chemistry informs biology; computer science and computer programming can be used in EVERYTHING; Mathematics one way or another informs all of STEM.
     
  5. Dec 4, 2015 #4
    I mean in general, what goes after those intro classes. What do i take after i completed biology 1 and 2 and chemistry and physics? I go to a community college and it's kind of limited. Only intro courses and that's it.
     
  6. Dec 4, 2015 #5
    I know that after completing general chemistry, there is organic chemistry and physical and biochemistry, but what about for physics and biology? As for those math courses after calculus, linear algebra and differential equations, what goes after that? It's not like i'm going to every upper level math and science courses, but are those the only courses I have to take, or do I have to take more?
     
  7. Dec 4, 2015 #6

    jtbell

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    Then browse a few 4-year college/university web sites. :smile:

    I can't address biology or chemistry, but I can say that in physics, once you get past the introductory sequence (usually three semesters including intro modern physics which is often a separate course from the other two), the course sequence is usually rather flexible. Most upper-division physics courses, including the "core four" of classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics and thermodynamics + statistical mechanics, have the intro physics sequence, three semesters of calculus, and differential equations as prerequisites, and can usually be taken in any order. There are usually some exceptions. For example, a nuclear physics course might require QM as prerequisite. QM might require linear algebra in addition to the other math. Classical mechanics probably doesn't require intro modern physics as prerequisite. But the overall pattern is flexible. The details vary from one school to another.
     
  8. Dec 4, 2015 #7
    Thank you, but as for math, after those courses, in general for all colleges/universities, what goes after calculus, LA and DQ
     
  9. Dec 4, 2015 #8
    And are they optional?
     
  10. Dec 4, 2015 #9

    jtbell

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    For a math major, I'll let someone else address that.

    For a physics major, that's often/usually all that's required in the way of separate math courses. Many schools have a "math methods" course for physics majors which covers topics like Fourier series, Fourier transforms, partial differential equations, etc. It may or may not be required for the major. Otherwise, physics courses tend to teach associated math topics as necessary. For example, an introductory course on general relativity usually doesn't require the student to have studied differential geometry beforehand, but instead teaches enough of it to satisfy the needs of the course.
     
  11. Dec 4, 2015 #10

    symbolipoint

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    Ricster55 said
    Physics is heavy with Mathematics of Trigonometry, Differential Equations, Calculus, greater than - much greater than Intermediate Algebra, and maybe some finite math, and at least some elementary statistics is useful at times. Physics connects numbers and shapes to many things.

    Biology can use as much Mathematics as does Physics, OR much different and less but involving Statistics, Growth and Decay models, and the subject focuses much on classification and complicated shapes. The type of Mathematics used or needed depends on the type of biological study of interest. Biology can be much messier than Physics.
     
  12. Dec 4, 2015 #11
    I would sit down with the counselor at your community college. The counselor should put you on the right track.
     
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