Question about The derivation of Lorentz equation in “The Behaviour of Measuring rods and clocks in motion”

  • #1

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Very confusing indeed.. How should I use the First and fourth Lorentz equation to get the t and t’ ??

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image.jpg
image.jpg
 

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  • #2
Nugatory
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You will get better and more helpful answers if you would tell us what book you're working from (the historians among us will recognize it but that's not somethng you should count on)and what problem you're trying to solve (we can guess, but again you shouldn't count on us guessing right).

My guess is that you're trying to derive either the length contraction formula or the time dilation formula... but if so you should show your work up to where you got stuck and we can help you past the hard spot.
 
  • #3
Ibix
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This book is available online. The photos in the OP are from https://www.bartleby.com/173/12.html. The first and fourth equations referred to are in the previous chapter, and are the ##x## and ##t## transforms. This is all information you really should have given in your first post.

All you are being asked to do is substitute the given values ##x## and ##t## into those formulae to get the corresponding ##t'## values. I don't see what's difficult about that. If that's not what you are trying to do, you need to explain more.
 
  • #4
This book is available online. The photos in the OP are from https://www.bartleby.com/173/12.html. The first and fourth equations referred to are in the previous chapter, and are the ##x## and ##t## transforms. This is all information you really should have given in your first post.

All you are being asked to do is substitute the given values ##x## and ##t## into those formulae to get the corresponding ##t'## values. I don't see what's difficult about that. If that's not what you are trying to do, you need to explain more.
I’ve been looking for the value of x and t but in the passage they only give the value of x’ and t’. Or is it actually the same value for both x and x’, and, t and t’? So i cannot derive the formula and get the equation in the passage. My confusion is in the passage:
“The first and fourth equations of the Lorentz transformation give for these two ticks: t=0 and t’= one over square root of one minus v square over c square.”
 

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  • #5
You will get better and more helpful answers if you would tell us what book you're working from (the historians among us will recognize it but that's not somethng you should count on)and what problem you're trying to solve (we can guess, but again you shouldn't count on us guessing right).

My guess is that you're trying to derive either the length contraction formula or the time dilation formula... but if so you should show your work up to where you got stuck and we can help you past the hard spot.
I think its the time dilation formula because it involves the two ticks of a clock. But i’m new to this, so i was hoping that someone could give an explanation as to the purpose of the Lorentz Equation and the way to derive the formula to get the equation of the two ticks.
 

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  • #6
I think its the time dilation formula because it involves the two ticks of a clock. But i’m new to this, so i was hoping that someone could give an explanation as to the purpose of the Lorentz Equation and the way to derive the formula to get the equation of the two ticks.
Its from the book “The special and general theory by Albert Einstein”
 
  • #7
Ibix
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I’ve been looking for the value of x and t but in the passage they only give the value of x’ and t’. Or is it actually the same value for both x and x’, and, t and t’? So i cannot derive the formula and get the equation in the passage. My confusion is in the passage:
“The first and fourth equations of the Lorentz transformation give for these two ticks: t=0 and t’= one over square root of one minus v square over c square.”
##x=0##, ##t=0## and ##x=0##, ##t=1##. It says so in your first picture.
 
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