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Question about titanium tetrachloride

  1. Mar 17, 2005 #1
    Why is it that a Greek prefix is used to name TiCl4? Shouldn't it just be titanium chloride? I thought using Greek prefixes was only for molecular compounds and hydrates... :confused:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 17, 2005 #2

    chem_tr

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    You are right; but please bear in mind that there are no 100% ionic and 100% covalent compound; titanium(IV) chloride as well as tin(IV) chloride, contain highly covalent bonding. We don't use these Greek prefixes for greatly ionic compounds like CaCl2. I think it makes some sense now.
     
  4. Mar 17, 2005 #3
    I see. So are Greek prefixes generally used to name covalent compounds? Or is titanium(IV) chloride an exception?
     
  5. Mar 17, 2005 #4
    A reason might be that titanium has multiple oxidation states, while calcium does not.
     
  6. Mar 17, 2005 #5

    chem_tr

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    They are not intended to be used in this sense, but there is a correct point in using these nomenclature. Titanium(IV) chloride and tin(IV) chloride, along with lead(IV) chloride contain a considerable ratio of covalent bonding, so you may use Greek prefixes for them. Chemistry is a flexible thing... I want to say that both are correct in their perspectives.
     
  7. Mar 17, 2005 #6

    Gokul43201

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    I too think this is important.
     
  8. Mar 18, 2005 #7

    chem_tr

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    I think that increasing oxidation number seems to increase the tendency of the ratio of covalent bonding.
     
  9. Mar 18, 2005 #8

    movies

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    In organic chemistry this reagent is usually referred to as titanium tetrachloride. I suppose that isn't the correct IUPAC name, but that's what you hear. TiCl3 is also a common reagent, so it's important to differentiate the two.
     
  10. Mar 18, 2005 #9

    GCT

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    Elements at the extreme ends tend to possess more specific oxidation states, particularly when they interact with each other (metal and nonmetal). From what I remember, the transition state elements tend to occupy charge differences in integers (1+,2+) while any of the known existing variations in oxidations states of nonmetals usually differ by even values (0,2-,4-). Not quite sure the reason for this at this time, its probably related to the nature of forming stable compounds with other elements; that is it depends somewhat on the "other" element, related to the electrostatic limitations of exactly how they can bond (i.e. covalent) and interact and the valencies of a particular element.
     
  11. Mar 30, 2005 #10
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2005
  12. Mar 31, 2005 #11

    I would call it sloppy chemistry, but it was explained to me in organic that organic chemistry uses many sloppy chemistry practices because it makes life easier. It's true that the bonds in TiCl4 are more covalent, that would be a good reason for the practice, however I believe the real reason is simply lazyness. And sometimes it's good to be lazy.

    where I work we simply refer to the stuff as tickle.
     
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