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Question about Vacuum

  1. Jan 8, 2005 #1
    Question about Vacuum !!

    I am having this doubt in my head that the existence of the so called "vacuum" doesn't actually exist...

    But, I would like to know what are the views of everyone about this entity. Does everyone believe that "empty space" (vacuum) actually exists?

    I've been thinking of the movement of gravity and EM waves, and I'm having the notion that there must be some medium for them to move across.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 8, 2005 #2

    quasar987

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    Last edited: Jan 8, 2005
  4. Jan 8, 2005 #3
    Ether? DID YOU NOT STUDY SPECIAL RELATIVITY?
     
  5. Jan 8, 2005 #4
    It's true that "empty space" doesn't exist. Well, another area of study!
     
  6. Jan 8, 2005 #5

    quasar987

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    "In 1887, a crucial experiment was performed by Michelson and Edward Morley in an attempt to detect the existence of the ether. The experiment, named the Michelson-Morley experiment in honor of its authors, shocked the scientific community by yielding results which implied the non-existence of ether. This result was later on used by Einstein to refute the existence of the ether and allowed him to develop special relativity without this artificial (and non-existent) constraint." (From physicsword)

    Scientists nowdays think empty space exists. Me, I dont know, but I'll thrust them for now.
     
  7. Jan 8, 2005 #6
    space is not empty. the ether exists. i dont care what anyone says. scientists make flaws all the time. two of the biggest flaws are special relativity and general relativity. newtons laws are in close second.
     
  8. Jan 8, 2005 #7

    dextercioby

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    I agree,the space is not empty.It's filled with vacuum fluctuations of the quantum fields,electromagnetic (see Casimir effect),gravitational...

    There's no such thing as vacuum.I always write this word 'vacuum'.

    Daniel.

    PS.The "ether" exists:etilic ether,metilic ether,etil-metil-ether,dimetil-ether...
     
  9. Jan 9, 2005 #8
    p53ud0 dr34m5 , how do you know that scientists make flaws?
     
  10. Jan 9, 2005 #9
  11. Jan 9, 2005 #10
    This is incorrect. The fluctuations are the elementary particles at hand...

    The vaccuum is filled with virtual particles because of the fact that QFT = QM + special relativity. They exist because we can use E=mc² and Heisenberg uncertainty at once...we can combine them. The Casimir-effect shiws the existence of such virtual particles.

    Don't think that these virtual particles are fluctuations of quantumfields...that is untrue. Besides you shouldn't have included gravity here because this is far too speculative and certainly no part of QFT.


    marlon
     
  12. Jan 9, 2005 #11
    Thanks marlon.

    So marlon, how do you explain the movement of gravity in space?
     
  13. Jan 9, 2005 #12
    What do you mean ??? How does gravity move. Curvature of spacetime ONLY occurs at the position of the object with mass M. There is NO action at a distance here because all is given in terms of fields...

    regards
    marlon
     
  14. Jan 9, 2005 #13
    well fields, manifolds that is

    marlon
     
  15. Jan 9, 2005 #14
    So, what about the movement of EM waves? How do you explain there movement in space?
     
  16. Jan 9, 2005 #15

    dextercioby

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    By using the famous Maxwell equations.Their interpretation reads:a time-depending electric field will generate a time dependent magnetic field which in turn generates a time depending electric field and so on...To show that these fields realy propagate (under the form of waves),u need to solve these equations.Not an easy task at HS level.

    Daniel.
     
  17. Jan 9, 2005 #16
    Alright Dex, merci pour l'information mon ami!
     
  18. Jan 9, 2005 #17
    Em-waves move at the speed of light. You know that EM waves can also be described in terms of photons of various energies, photons always move at the speed of light. This is also consistent with the "local action" of such processes that justify the use of fields for these concepts. The dynamics of EM-waves is governed by the Maxwell-equations.

    regards
    marlon

    ps if you wanna know more on fields, just check out my journal and goto the "WHY FIELDS ARE USED"-entry. I dunno what page it is but you will find it there
     
  19. Jan 9, 2005 #18
    Thanks marlon. I'll check out your journal.
     
  20. Jan 9, 2005 #19
    Zamieen, its obvious that scientists make flaws in their attempts to explain what they are unable to explain. im sure if you took a good look at the standard model, you would notice an array of flaws. the only thing the standard model is consistent with are flaws. i just like to rant in a nonsensical manner. everything is just so simple; yet, scientists complicate it with irrational claims.
     
  21. Jan 9, 2005 #20

    dextercioby

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    Please,feel free to tell us what is "standard model" (N.B.incomplete name) full of flaws... :tongue2:

    Daniel.

    PS.Guys,if he answers,mode this thread to "Theory Subdevelopment"... :tongue2:
     
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