Question regarding Atomic Structure (orbits)

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem with calculating the number of orbits an electron makes in a given time period. The solution involves finding the velocity of the electron and using equations related to its speed and orbit. The conversation also mentions the importance of correctly interpreting units in the calculations. Despite initially having the correct answer for one part, it is pointed out that the wrong procedure is being used. Both responders provide detailed explanations and the issue is resolved.
  • #1
Sanosuke Sagara
102
0
I have my doubt,solution and question in the attachment that followed.Thanks for anybody that spend some time on this question.
 

Attachments

  • Doc 2.doc
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  • #2
It's only a coincidence that you got the right number for part (a). The fact that using the same procedure for part (b) gives the wrong answer, is a good indicator that you are using the wrong procedure.

Your problem is that you are calculating [itex]1 / \lambda[/itex] which is not a number of revolutions. It's simply the reciprocal of the wavelength, with units of 1/meters. The answer you need doesn't have any units; it's just a "counting" number.

I suggest that you look in your textbook for equations related to the speed [itex]v[/itex] of the electron in an orbit with quantum number [itex]n[/itex], and the radius [itex]r[/itex] of that orbit. If you know those quantities, you can calculate the time the electron takes for one orbit (the period, [itex]T[/itex]), and from that, the number of orbits it makes in [itex]10^{-8}[/itex] seconds.
 
  • #3
Ok first of all, calculate the wavelength emitted , in the same way you have calculated in your doc-attachment.then calculate the velocity of the electron in n=2 , i hope you can do that.
then v= (frequency) (wavelength)
calculate frequency with the above formula , this will be give you cycles /sec

Now you want cycles in [itex]10^-8[/itex] seconds , use unitary method.I am getting the correct answer.
 
  • #4
Yes your both are right and I admit that I just have the 'luck' getting the first answer right and not the second.Thanks for your both detail explanation,jtbell and Dr.Brain,I really appreciate it.
 

1. What is an atomic orbit?

An atomic orbit is the path followed by an electron around the nucleus of an atom. It is often depicted as a circular or elliptical shape, but in reality, it is a three-dimensional probability distribution of where the electron is likely to be found.

2. How are atomic orbits related to the structure of atoms?

The number and arrangement of atomic orbits determine the electron configuration of an atom, which in turn determines its chemical properties and reactivity. The orbits also play a role in the energy levels of electrons and the emission of light by atoms.

3. Do electrons always follow the same orbit around the nucleus?

No, electrons do not follow a fixed path around the nucleus. According to the principles of quantum mechanics, the exact position and momentum of an electron cannot be known simultaneously, so its orbit is constantly changing.

4. Can electrons jump between orbits?

Yes, electrons can jump between different energy levels or orbits by absorbing or emitting energy in the form of photons. This process is known as electron excitation or de-excitation and is responsible for the emission and absorption of light by atoms.

5. How do scientists determine the number and arrangement of atomic orbits in an atom?

Scientists use various techniques, such as spectroscopy, to study the behavior of electrons in atoms and determine their energy levels and arrangement. The quantum mechanical model of the atom also provides a mathematical framework for predicting the number and arrangement of atomic orbits in an atom.

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