Question regarding buying house.

  • Thread starter Holocene
  • Start date
  • #1
231
0
Well I'm 24 living with parents, and I'm not too sure I want to continue this into my late-20's.

Apartments really don't appeal to me, though I guess if I foresaw a future need to relocate, they'd be a viable option.

Basically, is there any general rule of thumb regarding how much money you should have set aside in the form of a down payment, so as to have a viable chance of getting approved for a mortgage loan?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
794
1
a shoe in is a good job and 20% down
 
  • #3
532
2
Rewebster has already stated the general rule of thumb. However, we recently got a 30-yr fixed mortgage with no money down, but we are required to pay about $40 dollars in mortgage insurance until 20% of the principal is paid off. Look into FHA loans; depending on your financial situation and credit history you may qualify for free grant money also to pay off part of your closing costs. Getting this grant and seller's assistance, we actually walked away from our closing with $18 in our pocket. =)

Never ever get a variable rate mortgage. I think balloon payments are not good either--things in life happen unexpectedly. I don't know why people do it. I guess the temptation and emotion of owning a dream house overpowers the logic of knowing one's real financial capabilities.
 
  • #4
LowlyPion
Homework Helper
3,090
5
a shoe in is a good job and 20% down

That's a pretty reasonable rule of thumb. They are checking things more closely these days with the credit crunch, but that still looks like it would fly if your income looks like it can support the mortgage.
 
  • #5
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
House? I plan on renting until I'm 30.

I think though that a good job is key. One that you're also happy with because buying a house is assuming you don't plan on quitting which can cause you to look elsewhere for jobs.
 
  • #6
Vanadium 50
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
26,952
10,765
Never ever get a variable rate mortgage.

Never ever?

I disagree: my first mortgage was an ARM. It was a useful financial instrument for me. It took me 9 years and 3 more mortgages in total, but today I own my house.
 
  • #7
Never ever?

I disagree: my first mortgage was an ARM. It was a useful financial instrument for me. It took me 9 years and 3 more mortgages in total, but today I own my house.

You owned your house on the first day that you bought it. You mean that today your mortgage is paid off.
 
  • #8
532
2
Never ever?

I disagree: my first mortgage was an ARM. It was a useful financial instrument for me. It took me 9 years and 3 more mortgages in total, but today I own my house.

Yes, your right. I was probably too strong with that the comment. They probably work out well for some people, but for others, the rate increases dramatically over time and they go into foreclosure because they can't make the monthly payments.
 
  • #9
NateTG
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
2,450
6
Basically, is there any general rule of thumb regarding how much money you should have set aside in the form of a down payment, so as to have a viable chance of getting approved for a mortgage loan?

The old (pre-insanity) rule of thumb is 20% down, and no more than two and a half times your annual income in the loan. Depending on where you live, now might not be the best time to buy. Interest rates are currently very low, so ARM financing is very risky.
 

Related Threads on Question regarding buying house.

  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
13
Views
2K
Replies
30
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
11
Views
593
  • Last Post
Replies
22
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
672
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
2K
Top