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A Question regarding gravity

  1. Oct 18, 2016 #1
    According to observations and known models mass is equal to the amount of atoms in a given space, and gravity is proportional to the amount of mass in a given space (ie. Sun > Earth > Moon) If those observations are undeniable then my question remains: is gravity directly related to groupings of atoms (mass) and if so could atoms interactions between one another be the trigger behind the phenomenon we call gravity?

    This is a legitimate question regarding personal research into Quantum Theory of Gravity, I am not presenting any personal theory simply asking a scientific question directed towards any readers that have a high-level background in the fields of Quantum, Particle and Theoretical physics. Thanks for reading and any comments/responses.
     
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  3. Oct 18, 2016 #2

    BvU

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    Hi Bill, :welcome:

    My guess is your post will go into a black hole once discovered by a moderator. You ask at an advanced level but you state at a subzero level. I don't know of any observations or known models that claim what you claim. Any references ?

    The logic is also somewhat weird, but perhaps your mother tongue is very different from english. There is no trigger behind gravity.

    Good thing you're not presenting any personal theory. Keep asking.
     
  4. Oct 18, 2016 #3

    PeroK

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    Your question is very unspecific. What sort of interaction do you have in mind?

    Also, gravity is proportional to the total mass, but not the density. If it were due to the interaction between particles, rather than due to a property of each individual particle, would the distance between adjacent particles and hence mass density not be relevant?
     
  5. Oct 18, 2016 #4
    Okay so we can agree gravity produced by a body is proportional to the mass it has, sorry I did not mention a specific interaction. I cannot be but so specific because of my lack of particle/quantum physics, but i believe it has something to do with the quantum interactions of at least two atoms. Density would be relevant in the observations of black holes covering little space yet producing tremendous gravity, a thought experiment: would 1 trillion hydrogen atoms produce the same gravitational effects as the same amount of atoms of iron contained in the same area? Thanks for the response, great rebuttal!
     
  6. Oct 18, 2016 #5
    I'm sorry if you did not understand the question, it takes an 'out of the box' thought process. A simplistic version would be: Does 1 trillion hydrogen atoms grouped in a given space produce the same gravitational effect as would 1 trillion helium atoms in the same space? Also gravity does not exist without a mass, so would it not be in a relationship with mass, possibly on the quantum scale? I'm simply trying to gather answers whether i am on a correct path so far.
     
  7. Oct 18, 2016 #6

    PeroK

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    If the sun were much smaller and denser than it is but had the same mass, then its gravitational effect on the planets would be unchanged.

    It's a common misconception that if the sun became a black hole it would consume the planets and the rest of the solar system by its supergravity. In fact it wouldn't, and the planets orbits would be unaffected.
     
  8. Oct 18, 2016 #7
    Okay I understand and your first part agrees with my hypothesis, but if the Sun were to collapse into a black hole logic shows that it would create a inward pull. Is that not correct?
     
  9. Oct 18, 2016 #8

    PeroK

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    It may be a big step back from quantum gravity, but have you ever see this equation:

    ##F = \frac{GMm}{r^2}##

    if you understand this and know the difference between a hydrogen and helium atom, then you could answer your own question.
     
  10. Oct 18, 2016 #9

    PeroK

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    It already has an inward pull. It's called its gravitational pull/force. That would not in general change if it were a black hole.

    You ought to learn some of the basics, you know. You're unlikely to make a breakthrough without them!
     
  11. Oct 18, 2016 #10

    Nugatory

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    As this is incorrect (google for "Einstein field equations" and then study the stress-energy tensor), any conclusions drawn from it will be based on a false premise.

    This thread is closed.
     
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