1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Question regarding mutual inductance of two coil

  1. Jan 2, 2005 #1
    I have my question,solution and the problem I faced in the attachment that followed.Thanks for anybody that spend some time on this question.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 2, 2005 #2
    Please , I really need someone help me figure out where I have done wrong.
     
  4. Jan 3, 2005 #3

    learningphysics

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I think you did everything correct. The flux linkage is: [tex]N\Phi[/tex] not [tex]\Phi[/tex] (this is only for 1 turn, not the entire coil). So for coil 1 you get:

    [tex]N\Phi=100*(1.5*10^{-6})=150\mu WB[/tex]

    and coil 2:

    [tex]N\Phi=200*(9*10^{-8})=18 \mu WB[/tex]
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2005
  5. Jan 3, 2005 #4

    Andrew Mason

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I take it that you are having problems with the flux linkage questions because you seem to have figured out the induced voltages. You may want to ask some engineers about flux linkage. It is a concept used more in engineering, but I will give it a shot.

    Flux linkage is a measure of how much magnetic field produced by the coil is enclosed by the coil windings. It seems to be a relationship between flux enclosed by the coil and the actual current - I think. Inductance expressed in terms of the actual current I is

    (1) [tex]L = nB\cdot A/I[/tex]

    where n is the number of windings, B the magnetic field in the coil and A the cross-sectional area.

    The term [itex]\lambda = nB\cdot A[/itex] is called the flux linkage.

    But since you are given L and I, you can work out flux linkage from (1).

    Does that help?

    AM
     
  6. Jan 3, 2005 #5
    Thanks for your help ,Andrew Mason and learningphysics.I now can understand with the question already.
     
  7. Jan 3, 2005 #6

    learningphysics

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I think an easier way to answer part a) is just to use the definition of inductance.

    [tex]L_1=N_1\Phi_1/I_1[/tex]
    [tex]25*10^{-3}=100(\Phi_1)/6*10^{-3}[/tex]
    [tex]\Phi_1=1.5*10^{-6}[/tex]
    [tex]N\Phi_1=100(1.5*10^{-6})=150 \mu WB[/tex]
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Question regarding mutual inductance of two coil
Loading...