Question regarding wave/particle duality

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Alright thanks, that clears it up. So the light source creates the magnetic field then. I guess I forgot that the thing that matters is which direction the poles are turned to. If they can move freely, then you will not notice the magnetic effect.

But that still means that the field will be different very far out in space then near earth? So how does that affect light?

Actually very interesting is that magnetic fields are kind of similar to gravity fields then? Because they both affect light. Both go on forever (unlike the other two forces right?).
 
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Alright thanks, that clears it up. So the light source creates the magnetic field then. I guess I forgot that the thing that matters is which direction the poles are turned to. If they can move freely, then you will not notice the magnetic effect.

Actually very interesting is that magnetic fields are kind of similar to gravity fields then? Because they both affect light. Both go on forever (unlike the other two forces right?).
There's two sightly different contexts in which field is used, which I think can cause confusion here. One is, for example, "the Earth's magnetic field". This refers to the effect of the Earth's magnetisation at all points in space. The other, is "the magnetic field". This refers to the effect of all sources of magnetisation at all points in space. There are many objects in the universe which are sources of magnetisation, some much stronger than the Earth's magnetic field.

All of the fundamental forces act over all distances, the nuclear forces fall off much quicker than the electromagnetic or gravitational forces, so their effects aren't seen at larger scales. Similarly, Earth's gravity is negligible in other galaxies.

But that still means that the field will be different very far out in space then near earth? So how does that affect light?
I doesn't. Let me give you an analogy. Water waves on a flat water surface are pretty much the same as water waves on the surface of the Earth even though the surface of the Earth is curved. Similarly for light, it's the oscillation that is important, not the background magnetic and electric field that they are on.
 
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Khashishi

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Magnetic fields are pretty different from gravitational fields. Magnetic fields don't affect light. Light is made of an electromagnetic field, but it will pass through another electromagnetic field without interacting (except in rare extreme conditions). This is why you can cross two flashlights and the beams just go through each other.
 
I got the range thing from this website, but I guess they are wrong then? Excuse my ignorance on the subject, just trying to figure out this stuff on my own as a hobby :) .
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/forces/funfor.html

There's two sightly different contexts in which field is used, which I think can cause confusion here. One is, for example, "the Earth's magnetic field". This refers to the effect of the Earth's magnetisation at all points in space. The other, is "the magnetic field". This refers to the effect of all sources of magnetisation at all points in space. There are many objects in the universe which are sources of magnetisation, some much stronger than the Earth's magnetic field.

All of the fundamental forces act over all distances, the nuclear forces fall off much quicker than the electromagnetic or gravitational forces, so their effects aren't seen at larger scales. Similarly, Earth's gravity is negligible in other galaxies.
Doesn't each particle have a magnetic direction? And if there is an imbalance in the direction in which they are pointed at, you get a magnet effect? If they cancel each other out and each particle has a random magnetic direction (or spin? or is that the wrong term), then there is no force, but the field is still there, just not noticable?

How strong is background magnetic field on earth compared to the earth's magnetic field? So of our magnetic field, how much does earth contribute? You would still notice differences if you are further out in space? And wont you notice a difference in the probability field of light and particles?

I doesn't. Let me give you an analogy. Water waves on a flat water surface are pretty much the same as water waves on the surface of the Earth even though the surface of the Earth is curved. Similarly for light, it's the oscillation that is important, not the background magnetic and electric field that they are on.
Isn't a better analogy two planets with different gravity? In that case you will see a difference between waves. The planet with higher gravity will have lower waves.

Magnetic fields are pretty different from gravitational fields. Magnetic fields don't affect light. Light is made of an electromagnetic field, but it will pass through another electromagnetic field without interacting (except in rare extreme conditions). This is why you can cross two flashlights and the beams just go through each other.
Well they do affect light? They are the reason the wave pattern can exist for light? Except they affect light in a different way.
 
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Magnetic fields don't affect light.
Quite the contrary - they change its polarisation as a classic experiment by Faraday demonstrated.

Note to Jimmyleggs. This does not affect the double slit.

The reason light can exist as waves is its a solution to the equation governing EM fields - Maxwell's Equations.

Thanks
Bil
 

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