Questions about ChemE?

  • Thread starter zachucsd
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  • #1
zachucsd
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Questions about ChemE??

I have questions regarding Chemical Engineering, which I am considering as a major at UC San Diego.
I am good at math but I did not particularly enjoyed my math classes in high school. Probably because I didn't study a lot.

I think science is fascinating, and chemical engineers can become involved in lots of science fields such as materials/chemical science, technology and computers, the petroleum industry, and even drug and biological research.
I took AP Calculus AB and it didn't kill me. It was differential equations but not to the extent of a full year of college calculus. I pulled of an A in class and a 5 on the test but I didn't enjoy it.

Do chemical engineers use more math than science?
And when people say "SO MUCH MATH!," what level of math and what kinds of math?

Thanks for any advice regarding Chemical engineering.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
uby
176
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chemical engineers will commonly utilize transport equations (heat, mass, etc.) to describe industrial processes. these involve solving differential equations.

you'll be hard pressed to find any engineering or science major that doesn't involve significant amounts of math, though some are easier than others.

don't worry so much about it, in my opinion.
 
  • #3
absurdist
67
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Ok as a sophmore let me tell you that ChemE is one of the most monotonous things you'll ever study flow rates, temperatures, pressures, valves, pipes and that sort of stuff.
That being said i think its one of the few field where you get to study all three sciences with math. As for the math I think the most complicated thing you l take is solving Differential Equations.
Youll have all sorts of design projects on how to synthesize chemicals on a large scale, designing the reactors, their economics, efficiency, etc.
I tend to hink of it as a specialized form of business but that's what engineering is fixing problems so that you deliver the product.
Opportunities are immense as all industries need process engineers, good pay and mobility.
If you are interested in becoming a project manager, process engineer or somethn of the sort, its ideal.
 
  • #4
Dbrickner
6
0


Don't even worry about the math and go for it. If you passed the AP test with a 5 you have already learned almost all the math, you just apply it now in all sorts of fun scenarios.

Differential equations aren't the most fun but it sure beats electrical engineering...
 
  • #5
Cuauhtemoc
65
0


You need solid calculus, differential equations skills...
But you will have plenty of time to improve these skills, so go for it.
It's not much math at all, in fact I wish we had more math
 

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