Questions about Diabetes: Insulin Needles, Type 2 & Autoimmune Diseases

In summary: Gluconeogenesis is the process of converting glucose from other sources into glucose that the body can use. Gliconeogenesis is also what happens when the liver stores glucose as glycogen. Finally, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the body's T-Cells mistake insulin-producing cells in the pancreas for foreign invaders and destroy them. This results in the body's inability to produce insulin and regulate blood sugar levels.
  • #1
zmike
139
0
I've been recently reading up on diabetes and there's some questions I can't find the answers to so if anyone here know please help

Are insulin needles used for type 2 diabetes?
-I keep hearing ppl saying that they are but isn't type 2 when the body doesn't respond to insulin?

Type 2 diabetes and hepatic glucose production?
-no idea what hepatic glucose production is

Only type 1 diabetes is autoimmune dieases.
-Shouldn't it be only type 2?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
zmike said:
Are insulin needles used for type 2 diabetes?
-I keep hearing ppl saying that they are but isn't type 2 when the body doesn't respond to insulin?

You are correct that in type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't respond to insulin. For this reason, in most cases, you can't treat type 2 diabetes with regular insulin injections. However, according to wikipedia, insulin treatment can be used in some cases (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes_mellitus_type_2#Insulin_preparations).

Type 2 diabetes and hepatic glucose production?
-no idea what hepatic glucose production is

It's when the liver uses fat and/or protein to produce glucose via gluconeogenesis. Also, because the liver stores glucose as glycogen, it could also relate to the release of stored glucose from the liver.

Only type 1 diabetes is autoimmune dieases.
-Shouldn't it be only type 2?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The body's T-Cells mistake insulin-producing cells in the pancreas for foreign invaders and destroy them. This results in the body's inability to produce insulin and regulate blood sugar levels. The causes of type 2 diabetes are not well understood and, although autoimmunity could possibly play some role, autoimmunity is not thought to be important in the onset of type 2 diabetes.
 
  • #3
Type II diabetes is insulin resistance, not a complete inability to use insulin. In early stages, the body still can produce insulin, and the treatment is usually to help the body increase its own insulin production as well as increase the responsiveness to it. However, over time, the cells that produce the insulin can start to "burn out" from such high levels of production, or can't produce enough for the limited amounts of receptor to respond to, even with a boost from medicine. At that point, insulin injections become necessary.

In case it wasn't clear from ygggdrasil's post, hepatic is an adjective that means something related to the liver.
 

Related to Questions about Diabetes: Insulin Needles, Type 2 & Autoimmune Diseases

1. What are insulin needles and why are they used in diabetes treatment?

Insulin needles are small, thin needles that are used to inject insulin into the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. These needles are necessary for administering insulin because it cannot be taken orally and needs to be injected directly into the bloodstream.

2. What is type 2 diabetes and how does it differ from type 1 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not use it effectively. This results in high blood sugar levels. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease where the body's immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells, type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by lifestyle factors such as obesity and physical inactivity.

3. Is type 2 diabetes preventable?

While genetics can play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes, it is largely preventable through healthy lifestyle choices. Maintaining a healthy weight, eating a balanced diet, and staying physically active can greatly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

4. Is there a cure for type 2 diabetes?

Currently, there is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. However, it can be managed and controlled through lifestyle changes, medication, and regular monitoring of blood sugar levels. Research is ongoing to find a cure for type 2 diabetes.

5. Are autoimmune diseases linked to the development of diabetes?

Some autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, do have a direct link to the development of diabetes. However, type 2 diabetes is not considered an autoimmune disease. While there may be overlap in risk factors and symptoms, the underlying causes and mechanisms of these diseases are different.

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