Questions about the traversable wormhole metric

  • Thread starter space-time
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  • #1
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First of all, the metric I am referring to is this one:

ds2= -c2dt2 + dl2 + (k2 + l2)(dᶿ2 + sin2(ᶿ)dø2)

where k is the radius of the throat of the wormhole. (sorry for the small Greek letters)

Now I have two questions about this solution to Einstein's equations:

1. What does the coordinate l represent? All I know is that its domain is all real numbers and negative values of l apparently represents another universe.

2. When this solution was derived, did the equations include the cosmological constant or was that just left out?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
bapowell
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1. Looks like [itex]l[/itex] is the radial coordinate.

2. In order for this to be a solution to Einstein's Equations, you need exotic matter that violates the energy conditions. There might be a cosmological constant but its contribution is swamped by that of the exotic matter.
 

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