Quick explanation for wormholes

In summary: Wormholes allow for "teleportation" from one point in spacetime to another. I put teleport in quotes because the points are adjacent (near each other) in spacetime, even if they do not appear adjecent in space. Teleportation is a process by which objects or people are transferred from one location to another. In the case of a wormhole, the two points are in different parts of the same space, but they are close enough to each other that they might as well be in the same place. Wormholes are thought to exist in our universe, but they are very rare. They are only open for a very short time, and they are only visible in
  • #1
Someone502
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0
i think this is kinda dumb but oh well

Can someone give me a detailed explianation. All i know is that they are holes thorugh space time that make a strait line not the shortest route, and they are only open for short times and mircoscopic.

Also could water hold them open?
 
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  • #2
That's not a dumb question at all. I've actually been wondering her the same thing.
 
  • #3
I'd try John Cramer's science column from Analog, which you can find online at

http://www.zamandayolculuk.com/cetinbal/AlternateViewColumnAV3.htm

for some basic discussion of wormholes The second question, at least, is easy to answer - water can't hold open wormholes, it takes "exotic matter".
 
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  • #4
All i know is that they are holes thorugh space time that make a strait line not the shortest route.

Wormholes allow for "teleportation" from one point in spacetime to another. I put teleport in quotes because the points are adjacent (near each other) in spacetime, even if they do not appear adjecent in space.

they are only open for short times and mircoscopic.

This is not the case, theoretically, and all discussion of wormholes is theoretical at this time.

Also could water hold them open?

Wormholes are generated by extreme gravitation. I can't see anyway for water to involved.
 
  • #6
pervect said:
I'd try John Cramer's science column from Analog, which you can find online at

http://www.zamandayolculuk.com/cetinbal/AlternateViewColumnAV3.htm

for some basic discussion of wormholes The second question, at least, is easy to answer - water can't hold open wormholes, it takes "exotic matter".

What would consitute "exotic matter"? I know this much:_: which is nothing on this subject. Which is why it interests me. :wink:
 
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  • #7
Pervect, that was a cool link by the way. One thing that wasn't mentioned in the article was how a wormhole is created. How is a wormhole created?
 

Related to Quick explanation for wormholes

1. What is a wormhole?

A wormhole is a hypothetical tunnel through space-time that connects two distant points in the universe. It is often described as a shortcut through the fabric of space, allowing for faster travel between two points.

2. How are wormholes created?

Wormholes are not naturally occurring and are only theoretical at this point. However, some theories suggest that they could be created by manipulating the fabric of space-time using intense gravitational fields or through advanced technology.

3. Can humans travel through wormholes?

Traveling through a wormhole is currently impossible as we do not have the technology or means to create or stabilize a wormhole. Additionally, the extreme conditions and forces within a wormhole would make it highly dangerous for human travel.

4. What is the purpose of studying wormholes?

Studying wormholes can help us gain a better understanding of the structure of space-time and the laws of physics. It could also potentially lead to advancements in space travel and the ability to explore distant parts of the universe.

5. Are wormholes a real scientific concept?

Wormholes are a theoretical concept in the field of physics and have not been proven to exist. However, many scientists continue to research and study the possibility of their existence through mathematical models and theories.

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