QUICK Help on Momentum Physics Lab

In summary, the conversation is about the concept of a spring continuing to vibrate and eventually coming to rest when stretched and then released. The person asking the question is trying to understand how to prove this in a laboratory setting and mentions the use of equations involving energy and force. They also mention needing to use notes on damped harmonic oscillator to verify their understanding.
  • #1

Homework Statement


I know the answer to this question but I just need to know how I can prove this in a laboratory fashion...

Here is the question:

Why doe s a spring continue to vibrate and eventually come to rest when stretched and then released??

It has something to do with calculating efficiency but I don't know how to prove that in a lab.

Homework Equations


I think you have to use Ee = 1/2 k x^2
F x = +/- k x

The Attempt at a Solution


I know the answer to the question but I need to verify how I can prove this if asked to do so in a lab

Thanks a lot!
 
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  • #2
Find some notes on damped harmonic oscillator.
 
  • #3


As a scientist, it is important to provide evidence and data to support our conclusions. In order to prove the concept of efficiency in the case of a spring vibrating and eventually coming to rest, you can conduct a lab experiment where you measure the displacement of the spring and the time it takes for it to come to rest after being stretched and released.

First, set up your lab equipment, including a spring, a ruler or measuring tape, and a stopwatch. Then, stretch the spring to a certain length and release it, allowing it to vibrate. Use the ruler or measuring tape to measure the displacement of the spring from its resting position at different time intervals, such as every 5 seconds.

Next, record the data and plot a graph of displacement vs. time. You should see that the amplitude of the vibrations decreases over time, as the spring loses energy and eventually comes to rest. This decrease in amplitude can be quantified as the efficiency of the spring, which is the ratio of the energy lost during each cycle to the total energy of the system.

To calculate the efficiency, you can use the equation Ee = 1/2 k x^2, where Ee is the elastic potential energy of the spring, k is the spring constant, and x is the displacement. By measuring the amplitude of the vibrations and using this equation, you can calculate the energy lost during each cycle and compare it to the total energy of the system.

By conducting this experiment and analyzing the data, you can prove the concept of efficiency in the case of a spring vibrating and coming to rest. This is just one example of how scientific experiments can be used to verify and prove concepts in physics.
 

1. What is momentum in physics?

Momentum is a physical quantity that describes an object's motion and is defined as the product of an object's mass and its velocity. In simpler terms, it is a measure of how difficult it is to stop an object from moving.

2. How is momentum calculated?

Momentum is calculated by multiplying an object's mass (m) by its velocity (v), using the equation p = mv. The unit for momentum is kg*m/s.

3. What is the conservation of momentum?

The law of conservation of momentum states that in a closed system, the total momentum before an event must be equal to the total momentum after the event. This means that momentum is conserved, or remains constant, in a system unless acted upon by an external force.

4. How is momentum related to force?

Momentum and force are related in that force is the rate of change of momentum. This means that the greater the force applied to an object, the greater the change in its momentum will be. This relationship is described by the equation F = ma, where F is force, m is mass, and a is acceleration.

5. How is momentum used in real-world applications?

Momentum has many real-world applications, such as in sports, where it is used to describe the motion and impact of objects like balls and athletes. It is also important in transportation, as the momentum of a moving vehicle must be considered to ensure safe braking and turning. In addition, momentum is used in industries such as engineering and aerospace to design and test structures and vehicles.

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