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Homework Help: Quick Q: Static Equilibrium

  1. Jul 23, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    screenshot_8.png

    2. Relevant equations
    Net Force = 0
    Net Torque = 0

    3. The attempt at a solution

    At the support point
    , is there a horizontal force component?​
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 23, 2015 #2

    Orodruin

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    This is irrelevant to the solution of the problem, why do you think it is an issue?
     
  4. Jul 23, 2015 #3
    shuoldn't I draw FBD first?
     
  5. Jul 23, 2015 #4
    shuoldn't I draw FBD first?
     
  6. Jul 23, 2015 #5
    shuoldn't I draw FBD first?
     
  7. Jul 23, 2015 #6

    Orodruin

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    You can do that if you want, but the question you should ask yourself once you have done that is: can I compute the result without knowing the answer to the question you just asked?
     
  8. Jul 24, 2015 #7
    I know the message you want to give me .. I would take net torque around the support point so all forces from it will have 0 torque.
    But i asked the question because there must be horizontal force produced from there. because there is only single horizontal force genrated from rope. so there must be a balancing force
     
  9. Jul 24, 2015 #8

    haruspex

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    Yes, you can assume there is sufficient friction at the support to prevent it slipping.
     
  10. Jul 24, 2015 #9

    Orodruin

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    Just to add: Otherwise it will slip and not be in equilibrium.
     
  11. Jul 24, 2015 #10
    Thanks!
     
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