Quick question about cell division

  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello everyone,

When a cell divide, do the organalles divide, or does DNA divide first, and using that DNA information new cells synthesize organalles. Thanks :smile:
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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In mitosis for eukaryotes , the some entire organelles (mitochondria chloroplasts) are inherited by each daughter cell, some can fragment (Golgi, ER). Membrane bound organelles such as chloroplasts and mitochondria must be intact in order to grow and divide into new organelles. When mitosis occurs the cell has enough of each organelle to allocate to each new cell. They are inherited as full and intact to the new cells. Endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi are able to form from fragments, and when mitosis begins they probably fragment and are inherited as fragments by each new cell.
I hope that answers your question, but just to clarify -
Organelles are growing and dividing during interphase before a cell divides
Mitochondria and chloroplasts actually have their own DNA, the cell DNA in the nucleus can not form new organelles of this type, they MUST be inherited from the previous cell.
I'm not totally sure about ER and Golgi but my guess is they must be inherited as well because the new cells can not synthesize them.
 
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  • #3
Monique
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There is also the idea that the mitotic spindle plays a role in organelle partitioning during cell division:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2775234/" [Broken]

During mitosis, the Golgi apparatus needs to be divided into the daughter cells. To achieve successful division, the single continuous Golgi ribbon is disassembled in early mitosis into vesicular and tubular membranes, which upon segregation fuse to reform a functional Golgi complex in telophase. Although the process of Golgi division has been well described, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. The observation that Golgi membranes accumulate around the spindle poles implies a role of the mitotic spindle in Golgi partitioning. By inducing asymmetrical cell division where the spindle goes into only one of the daughter cells, we have recently shown that the inheritance of a continuous Golgi ribbon critically relies on the mitotic spindle, while membranes sufficient to reassemble polarized, functional Golgi stacks are inherited independently.
 
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