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Homework Help: Quick question. Do they equal?

  1. Nov 8, 2004 #1
    Does 32.7s^-1=3.27s ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 8, 2004 #2
    Assuming that s is seconds, no.

    s^-1 can't equal s.

    --J
     
  4. Nov 8, 2004 #3
    32.7s^-1=1/3.27s ?
     
  5. Nov 8, 2004 #4

    Tide

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    Homework Helper

    Yes. E.g. if [itex]s = \sqrt {10}[/itex]

    :smile:
     
  6. Nov 8, 2004 #5
    [tex]
    32.7s^{-1} = \frac{32.7}{s}
    [/tex]
     
  7. Nov 8, 2004 #6
    is the exponent for the unit, or the number?

    if it is for the number

    (1/32.7) s

    if its for the unit, it would indicate (1/s) which to me means per second.
     
  8. Nov 8, 2004 #7
    32.7 s^-1 = 32.7/s

    If you want the magnitude in the denominator, you have to write,

    [tex]\frac{32.7}{s} = \frac{1}{\frac{s}{32.7}} = \frac{1}{.3058s}[/tex]

    -J
     
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