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Radial Antenna (atom scale)

  1. Nov 28, 2015 #1
    As any RF engineer knows the radial antenna is something pure theoretical. But as someone who loves physics an idea came to my mind. Please tell me if this would work and if not, why does it fail to work.
    So: Assuming we have an atom with 8 valence electrons which is hit with 8 photons with enough energy to boost the electrons to the next energy level. These electron packs are sent at ~ 10kHz. When the electrons fill the s and p orbitals of the next energy level ( which are pretty symmetrical on all 3 axes ) they move further away from the protons therefor less of the electrostatic field locks in a dipole manner and more of it gets radiated radially away from the atom.
    Now considering the closed Gaussian surface of maxwell's first equation a sphere we would observe that at the point in time in which the electrons are excited there is a E field, while they are not (when the photon is re-emitted) the E field is much lower, therefor we observe an electron radially spreading RADIO spectrum EM waves (~10kHz).
    I also considered how the quantum numbers may come in play, but I can't figure any real contribution they would make in this problem.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 28, 2015 #2

    mfb

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    I don't think that makes sense.

    You can emit radiation with the same expected power everywhere, but then you have some probabilistic process in it. Changing charge distributions that are spherically symmetric do not radiate at all.
     
  4. Nov 28, 2015 #3
    Yes you are right. I feel foolish for not realizing this from the start. Thanks for your time. So there is no way to make an isotropic antenna? I was also thinking of a magnetron with equally spaced resonant cavities positioned normally on a sphere which act like wave guide antennas. But i can't really imagine how to create the interior magnetic field so the electrons from the cathode accelerate uniformly in the interior of the sphere so that no cavity gets more field than another.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 28, 2015
  5. Nov 29, 2015 #4

    mfb

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    There is no perfectly spherical symmetric radiation that satisfies the Maxwell equations.
     
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