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Radio waves and charge

  1. Jul 29, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    AM radio allows a speration of 10kHz between frequencies of different radio stations. Why do AM radio receivers need a large Q? Estimate the Q required for good AM reception.

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I'm really not sure where to begin! :confused:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 29, 2007 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

  4. Jul 30, 2007 #3
    It's not in my textbook but I found out that AM radio receivers need a large q-factor to have a sharper resonance. However I can't find Q required for good AM reception. Any suggestions?
     
  5. Jul 30, 2007 #4

    andrevdh

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    A electronic oscillator produces em waves at a certain frequency. But the waves are not confined to a particular frequency, instead they spread over a range of frequencies. The most intense radiation (largest power output) is at its resonance frequency. The Q factor quantifies this spread in frequencies. If the stations are too close together the signals from the various transmitters will interfere with the reception.
     
  6. Jul 30, 2007 #5
    Thanks for that more thorough explanation. Still don't know what a good Q is for radio reception though -_-"
     
  7. Jul 30, 2007 #6

    andrevdh

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    The signals from one station should not overlap with the signal from another station. So you use the given frequency difference between stations to check what the minimum Q factor should be at the mid AM frequency transmissions.
     
  8. Jul 31, 2007 #7

    andrevdh

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