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Radius of Bomb Explosion

  1. Dec 1, 2007 #1
    Hi all, I'm working on a project for an Environmental Engineering class. I'm not a physicist...

    I need to estimate the radius of explosion of a bomb that contains about 400 lb (180kg) of high explosives.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 1, 2007 #2

    pervect

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    Why do you want/need to know the radius of a bomb explosion, exactly?
     
  4. Dec 1, 2007 #3

    berkeman

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    I don't believe that question is for an Environmental Engineering class. Thread locked.

    Discussions regarding dangerous activities are not generally allowed here on the PF, for obvious reasons.
     
  5. Dec 3, 2007 #4

    berkeman

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    Well, after a very thoughtful PM from the OP, I'm unlocking this thread. The OP will post a clarification of his question to help guide the responses.
     
  6. Dec 3, 2007 #5
    I am sorry, but this thread may help terrorists !
     
  7. Dec 3, 2007 #6

    berkeman

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    Not in the context that will be clarified by the OP, when they get a chance to log back in and add to this thread. Please stand by.....
     
  8. Dec 3, 2007 #7

    dst

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    I don't understand why a terrorist would even need to control a bomb's explosion radius?
     
  9. Dec 3, 2007 #8

    cristo

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    Clearly, discussions regarding anything to do with terrorism are not permitted on the forums. I propose that we do as berkeman says, and await the next post from the OP.
     
  10. Dec 3, 2007 #9
    Well, it may have something with the effect radius. Moreover, when discussing, other details may burst out.
     
  11. Dec 3, 2007 #10

    FredGarvin

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    Not control...to verify. It helps in planning to know the capabilities of your weapon.

    I agree with Berkeman as well. In this day and age, the OP should have presented the question better.
     
  12. Dec 3, 2007 #11
    Sorry everyone, I honestly didn't think about the ramifications of my original post. I actually agree that it was a good idea to lock this thread. Here's some more info:

    There are many known instances of bombs having been jettisoned from aircraft into oceans, finally coming to rest in the sediment without exploding.

    My question relates to environmental engineering in this sense. If a team were to attempt an excavation of a particular explosive device they run the risk of detonating that device.

    The blast radius would be an important consideration in determining environmental damage.

    My particular interest is whether or not a bomb of this size would create a blast powerful enough to displace the miocene layer above the florida regional aquifier momentarily, thus allowing fresh (drinking) water to become contaminated with sea water/sediment.

    Distance between explosive device and aquifier: 75 feet
    I'm not looking for an exact answer, just a rough estimate.
     
  13. Dec 3, 2007 #12

    dst

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    Well it depends on the explosive doesn't it? We're obviously talking about detonants but then you have primary vs secondary explosives (any difference?). Out of my league here. Too many things to consider.
     
  14. Dec 3, 2007 #13

    Astronuc

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    So, as I understand the problem, a device is resting on the ocean floor (sea bed) and 75 ft below is a freshwater aquifer.

    And the question is whether or not an explosion would cause a rupture in that 75 ft, or at least fracture the rock?
     
  15. Dec 3, 2007 #14
    Astronuc, yes I think you've got it right.

    Actually, to be more specific, there is a layer of sediment, underneath which there is 40-50 feet of "miocene clay" or rock, and then the aquifier. the device is located in the sediment.

    Also, let's assume the explosive to be trinitrotoluene (TNT).
     
  16. Dec 3, 2007 #15
    don't you need to tell us how much you are putting in
     
  17. Dec 3, 2007 #16

    berkeman

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    I guess I'm getting pretty uncomfortable again with this thread. Even if ledtenant's intentions are genuine (I think they are), a discussion like this does have some bad possible implications, along the lines of what Russ mentioned. I'm afraid I'm going to have to lock this thread again. Perhaps lesdtenant can try PM'ing Astro to handle this outside the open forums.
     
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