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Radon price: $4/m ?

  1. Mar 31, 2005 #1
    Radon price: $4/m ??

    I'm doing some research on Radon. I have to put together a PowerPoint presentation that describes its origins, properties, characteristics, etc. (Each student was assigned a different element.)

    One piece of information I'm required to report on is current price to purchase a sample of the element. I have found only one source that mentions a purchase price for Radon, and it says "Radon can be purchased for approximately $4/m." - without further explanation.

    What is "m"?? I assume it must be a unit of volume or mass, but if so I'm not familiar with it.

    Any ideas?
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 31, 2005 #2


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    Mmmmm metre, that well known unit of mass... :smile:

    Can we see the source?
  4. Mar 31, 2005 #3
    Yes, of course! Sorry, I should have posted that.

    The actual quote is "Radon is available at a cost of about $4/m."


    edit: That same source has a table above the text which states that the cost is "$/100g" (no numeric value is given).
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2005
  5. Mar 31, 2005 #4
    Hmmm... I just found another source that says: "Radon is available at a cost of about $4/m Ci."

    I know that Ci is a Curie, measuring radioactivity. Could "m Ci" mean mCi: a milli-Curie?

    edit: second source is http://www.speclab.com/elements/radon.htm
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2005
  6. Mar 31, 2005 #5

    Andrew Mason

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    That would be right.

  7. Mar 31, 2005 #6
    Woohoo! That makes a lot more sense than "m"!
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