Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Raised very formal but

  1. Jan 2, 2014 #1
    It seems okay to make good use of expletives in notes when needed.
    imho
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 3, 2014 #2
    Like "Dang", "Crud", and "Holy Molley"?
     
  4. Jan 3, 2014 #3
    Let us not forget 'dag-nabbit!' :)
     
  5. Jan 7, 2014 #4
    What are you talking about?
     
  6. Jan 8, 2014 #5
    I was having some frustration with a problem I was working on so took it out on my notebook.
     
  7. Jan 8, 2014 #6

    Office_Shredder

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I once did a research project where I was instructed to keep detailed notes on my work in a notebook. The writing style was... let's call it casual. At the end the professor in charge informed me that the grant required that I turn the notebook over in case anybody wanted to audit the work I did during the project. It is now in the possession of the federal government.
     
  8. Jan 8, 2014 #7

    D H

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    I had a similar experience. Project management wanted my notebook containing detailed derivations for a complicated software model of a physical process. About ten pages in the middle of the notebook contained pages marked with a big X across the page, plus some descriptive words. The first couple pages used colorful terms related to bodily waste. After that it was just "WRONG," "STILL WRONG," "YEP. THIS IS WRONG, TOO", and finally, "ALL THAT WRONG <deleted> STOPS HERE."

    It was received with some level of amusement.
     
  9. Jan 8, 2014 #8

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Have you ever used expletives in your code? Like printf("An **** programmer wrote it.\n") or puts("*** again?"); ?

    I did in the past. Then a fried o mine (owner of a small software company at the time) told me a story about how he was asked by a prospective client to show him an alpha version of the software they were working on...
     
  10. Jan 8, 2014 #9

    AlephZero

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    We were once beta-testing a new Fortran compiler from IBM, when it failed to compile some perfectly legal (and simple) code with the fatal error message THAT USELESS ****** DAVE HASN'T WRITTEN THIS BIT YET.

    The best part of the joke was not the message, but IBM's over-reaction when we sent back the formal error report!
     
  11. Jan 8, 2014 #10

    Office_Shredder

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I was working on a project (for strictly internal use, so presentability was irrelevant) with someone whose job it was to write a java application that used sockets, and we were running into issues with regards to the computer correctly releasing (not sure if this is the technical term, he was there to be the guy who knows what a socket is) the socket when we were done using it. We were never able to fix all the issues, and by the end of it our official error message scheme that we documented was broken down into the number of times the words "****ing socket" was used.
     
  12. Jan 8, 2014 #11

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Not profanity, but related:

    I was working on a project that involved an amine that was a fine powder and smelled soooooo fishy. In the report I submitted to my boss, I referred to this compound as "powdered cat breath":

    I thought she would be amused - she had a good sense of humor!

    Well the final report was sent to the home office in Finland, and a good part of it was the report I wrote, cut and pasted *without edits*. I don't know if it was an oversight or if she just didn't read what I wrote, but I'm sure some poor Finnish chemist was left wondering, "powdered cat breath"...wth?!?!
     
  13. Jan 8, 2014 #12
    What does it mean for someone to audit your research? Like they'll go through it and look for stuff you did wrong?

    If so, that seems like a really crappy way to treat somebody...
     
  14. Jan 9, 2014 #13

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Well when you're using public money to write things notebooks, the public deserves to see what you wrote.

    The only place I've experienced it is in vertebrate animal research labs, where there are ethics considerations. I've never seen it in theoretical research.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
  15. Jan 9, 2014 #14

    Office_Shredder

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    My understanding was basically if someone accused the professor of wasting the grant money, they could simply check the notebooks to see if research was actually being done.
     
  16. Jan 9, 2014 #15

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    That's possible, but I really only see it in experimental labs. We still use federal money in computational/theoretical pursuits. Of course, they're allowed to confiscate our computers... but then you're relying on being able to understand scatter-brained code without proper annotaiton :bugeye:

    (I guess that's really no different than scatterbrained notebooks with bad handwriting though...)
     
  17. Jan 9, 2014 #16

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    :rofl:
     
  18. Jan 9, 2014 #17

    phion

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I guess it's OK as long as you can deliver.
     
  19. Jan 9, 2014 #18
    And warranted when you can't.
     
  20. Jan 9, 2014 #19

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    "Powdered cat breath" sounds like a machine translation.
     
  21. Jan 9, 2014 #20
    I was thinking more Gleipnir from norse mythos...
    Went a bit wrong on the beard thing...
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Raised very formal but
  1. Formalism (Replies: 9)

  2. Obama raises the Dead (Replies: 5)

  3. Raising chickens (Replies: 188)

Loading...