Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Raising water to first floor

  1. Nov 22, 2012 #1
    Can anyone please clarify me a questions that I am unable to find an answer or understand in broader perspective:

    We have seen tap water coming out with a force via a tank placed up in a multi storied apartment. Assume that I need to connect a rubber pipe in the tap at ground floor and put the pipe in upwards directions at a height of first floor.

    Will the water come in the pipe at the first floor level - please note that water is continuously coming out from the tap - if not what can be done to make the water come till first floor?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 23, 2012 #2

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    If the tank is higher than the first floor then water will come out at first floor level. If the tank is lower than the first floor it won't.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Nov 23, 2012 #3

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Perhaps i missunderstand the question?.. If this is the situation (see drawing) then no water comes out when the tap is open. Thats because the tap releases/reduces the pressure created by the head of water in the tank.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Nov 23, 2012 #4

    K^2

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Tap won't reduce pressure to zero. If it did, two people wouldn't be able to use water from same water tower at the same time, unless at exactly the same elevation. This is clearly false.

    This does, however, imply limitations. The pressure drop due to open tap will be related to the flow velocity in the pipes. In fact, you can use Bernoulli Eqn. to gauge effect of the open tap. Knowing diameter of the pipes and flow rate, decrease in maximum elevation could be evaluated. Of course, that's only going to be valid under assumption of inviscid flow and incompressible fluid.
     
  6. Nov 23, 2012 #5
    Thanks for your reply.

    Please find the picture attached as per expected scenario in my response. One correction the tap to water line connection from the tank is actually like a joint, as such the water line from tank would stretch further on.

    The water from the tank is actually pumped through a motor and water oozes out from tap as shown in the figure. The motor is missing in my diagram just for the fact that even if in case motor is not there I believe water should come to level of first floor. Please confirm.

    The diameter of the pipe obviously has to be same of tap for its perfect fittings / bindings.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 23, 2012
  7. Nov 23, 2012 #6

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    See my first diagram. If the hose is the only thing connected it should be possible to raise the end to the same level as the water in the tank.

    The pump might complicate things but I would hope not. Most pumps will provide at least 1 bar pressure which is enough to go up about 10m.
     
  8. Nov 23, 2012 #7

    K^2

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    That was my first thought, looking at the picture, but he also said this.
    Which makes me think water is free to flow elsewhere. So it still goes to your option with the tap and the split. So the level is still going to be reduced and he's providing no information to even guess by how much.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook