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Ramsauer townsend effect

  1. May 29, 2010 #1
    Can someone explain this concept to me. I have found quite a few explanations on the internet, but i don't understand them.

    Basically i understand that it has to do with an electron wave being incident on some object and being able to continue on undisturbed.Ie total transmission, but what is the significance of this? if we have for example a potential well and the energy is greater than V, then we would expect it to get through anyway>

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  2. jcsd
  3. May 29, 2010 #2

    Meir Achuz

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    In general, there is transmission and reflection. If the phase shift of the wave is 2 pi, there will be no reflection. This is called the R-T effect.
     
  4. May 29, 2010 #3
    What is the significance of this? is there a use for having total transmission? and experimentally what would be observed, say if we have a hydrogen atom or any atom, and pass a current trough it and get the ramsouer townsend effect?
     
  5. May 30, 2010 #4

    Meir Achuz

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    If you want to transmit something, total transmission is as good as it gets.
     
  6. May 31, 2010 #5
    That implies that there is neither any dispersion or refraction? Physically that would mean that the material would be transparent, wouldn't it?
     
  7. May 31, 2010 #6

    Meir Achuz

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    Yes. It is no different than coating a lens to eliminate reflection.
     
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