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Random signal is represented by s(t), and is a varying voltage

  1. Aug 1, 2009 #1
    So a random signal is represented by s(t), and is a varying voltage over time.

    If the signal was random, and you take it's autocorrelation function R(Tau), this is essentially equal to it's power. E{s(t+Tau)s(t)}

    The fourier transform of this, is the Power Spectral Density of the signal, and is a representation of the allocation of power in the frequencies of the signal.

    My question is, for deterministic signals, what are the analoges to this?

    What is the fourier transform of s(t), what physical quantity does that represent?

    What is the equivalent of a power specrtral density for deterministic signals?
     
  2. jcsd
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