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Rank these schools for undergraduate Chem Engineering, please

  1. Mar 2, 2005 #1
    GA Tech
    Berkeley
    UCSD
    UT Austin
    UCLA
    Rose-Hulman.

    So far i've been admitted to Rose-Hulman and GA Tech. I am still waiting to hear from the rest. I am seriously considering GA Tech at this point. Area is important and that is why i'm ruling out Rose-Hulman at this point. Berkeley is much more expensive than GA Tech, so if it isn't a MUCH better program I think I might pass on it if I get in.

    Please let me know how you rank these schools for their Chem E programs and why.

    Forgot to mention, i'm transferring in as a Junior, so I won't be taking many if any 2000 level classes at these institutions if that makes a difference in your ranking.

    Thanks!
    Angela.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 2, 2005 #2
    I would like to know how hard it was to transfer to these schools. Were they able to grant any fin. aid? Was your GPA (3.0 > GPA > 3.5) or (3.5 > GPA > 4.0)? The reason I ask is that I am considering transfering but I have no idea how diffucult it.
     
  4. Mar 2, 2005 #3
    I have not rec'd financial aid packets yet. I can tell you right now that I will not qualify for anything need-based, but possibly merit-based.

    I have an overall gpa of 3.73 currently. However, only 58 of my credits will transfer. My gpa for my transferrable coursework is 3.9.

    These schools did not factor in my HS education. I got a ged.

    -A
     
  5. Mar 3, 2005 #4
  6. Mar 3, 2005 #5
    I was a junior as well when I transferred from art school to Microelectronic Engineering. Some jump! I only got 32 transfer credits!!!

    I was in a 5 year program, spent 3 years, and moved to another 5 year program, where I was essentially deemed a freshman again. I'm graduating in 2009, instead of my original 2006.
     
  7. Mar 3, 2005 #6
    I'm transferring in at junior level. Some of the credits I have are low level maths, and things that don't apply to this degree. So, i'm not really upset about losing them. And, once i'm done with this semester, and summer, I will have at least 11, maybe 15 more transferrable credits [Linear Algebra, Org I & II, C++ programming].

    I am in community college, so regardless I have to transfer somewhere. I'd rather lose a few credits on my way to a good school, then transfer everything to a crappy one:p

    Angela.
     
  8. Mar 3, 2005 #7
    Personally, I usually go by USNWR rankings for simplicity, being that there are so many variables in arguing how one uni may be better or worse than other. But nonetheless...

    My opinion:

    1) UCB

    gap

    2) GA tech
    3) Rose-Hulman
    4) UT-Austin
    5) UCLA
    6) UCSD

    There are distinctive advantages for each school. Size, general admissions standards, etcetera.
     
  9. Mar 3, 2005 #8
    You'll need a bare minimum 3.0 to transfer. I don't think anyone's chances of transferring to a UC from out of state, especially Berkeley, would be very good without top stats and EC's.

    Transferring is not an easy process... especially if done during the semester. I would suggest making very sure that you really want to transfer. Nothing would be worse than transferring somewhere new and finding out that you don't like it or it's not what you wanted.
     
  10. Mar 3, 2005 #9
    Thanks for replying. Why do you feel Berkeley is such a better school than GA Tech? And, why such a large 'gap'? And, what makes GA Tech better than Austin or UCSD for that matter? Can you give me an idea of any of the advantages of one over the other?

    At this point, I am pretty set on going to GA Tech if I would not rec'v much gain by going anywhere else. GA Tech out-of-state yrly is 18k, Berkeley out-of-state is going to be about 25k. I hear that GA Tech keeps you as out-of-state if you transfer in as such, so no benefit of in-state tuition ever. Is that the case with all/most universities? How about the UCs? I have sent e-mail but gotten no reply yet.

    Thanks a bunch!
    Angela.
     
  11. Mar 3, 2005 #10
    Berkeley is sometimes considered a "public ivy"... it constantly ranks in at the top 5 public universities. It is an excellent school for science in general, as well as engg, and it's prestige is definitely a benefit. In my opinion, the school as a whole, and the environment contained therein makes it the best choice of your list.

    HOWEVER, for the financial reasons you listed, I personally would think it not worth a major difference in tuition.

    The "gap" is just a representation of the differences in ranking and overall prestige. Not necessarily for engg.

    The other rankings I listed were just my personal opinion of the schools as a whole, taking into account reputation, overall rankings, as well as engg rankings and opportunities. Most certainly, a very large school will have more options and opportunities at it's disposal than a small specialty school.

    For a difference of 7K a year, I personally think it's a close call. Have you visited both? Do you know, in detail, what all each school has to offer? What kind of environment are you looking for for the next four years?

    I honestly haven't heard of any university keeping one as out-of-state. Usually it's the privates that charge a fixed rate for any given student, and the publics that differ with location.

    I am relatively positive that the UC's do have both in- and out-of-state tuition.

    I would strongly recommend visiting the www.collegeconfidential.com discussion boards. They have individual boards for all of your schools listed, as well as a multitude of information and knowledge that I think you would find very usefull.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2005
  12. Mar 3, 2005 #11
    For Berkeley, you can only transfer once a year, that is they only accept applications for the fall semester.
     
  13. Mar 4, 2005 #12
    I go to UCB as an EECS major, and I'm also a transfer. We don't get many out of state people here... I remeber durring orientation they asked who was out of state and 2 people rose thier hands. One was from texas and the other was from North Carolina or something. It doesn't mean you won't get in, its just a lot easier for in state people becuase Arnold wants you to go to community college first to save money for the state ;).

    The tutition for out of state students is ridiculously more than residents too. Plus transfering into the college of engineering here is a total *****. They won't let you change your major under any circumstances, and you have to make up a lot of classes if they don't think the ones from your old college were good enough.

    But it is true that the cheme program here is really hardcore. So if you wanna do it, make sure you want to be a chemical engineer and you wanna make all the sacrifices (money and otherwise).
     
  14. Mar 4, 2005 #13
    Are career prospects better better for one who has:

    A) Gone to a well known school and earned good grades (=>3.5) and had a couple of internships*;
    or
    B) Gone to relatively no-name school, earned better grades(3.8-4.0), and had several internships and at least one undergraduate research position?

    *where internships are of similar quality in both cases.
     
  15. Mar 4, 2005 #14

    It's hard to say, especially without defining majors or what constitutes a well known school.

    If you're talking Princeton versus some state university satellite school, then the answer is obvious. Similarly if you're comparing a chemical engineering major at Cal-Tech versus an english major at UMinn. Obviously extreme examples, but it's difficult to give you a thought out answer without the parameters being defined a bit more.
     
  16. Mar 4, 2005 #15
    okay,

    Parameters: scientific/applied major, like Mechanical Engineering

    School gamut (in no particular order): CMU, Maryland-College Park, New Mexico State University, Cornell, Cooper, Brown. I currently attend New Mexico State (for ME, freshmen year, with "better grades").

    edit- the reason i post in this thread is that i think there can be a case made for lesser school quality and more internships/higher grades, vs. better school and less job experience. If so, this can be applied to chem engineering. In the end, you want to maximize your education at minimal cost.
     
  17. Mar 4, 2005 #16
    For a difference of 7K a year, I personally think it's a close call. Have you visited both? Do you know, in detail, what all each school has to offer? What kind of environment are you looking for for the next four years?

    ** I think you're probably right. No, I have not visited both, actually, so far i've visited neither. I don't have the money to take trips to places i'm not sure i'll get into. Since i've been offered admission at GA Tech, i'm going up there next weekend (11th) to check out Atlanta and then the school that Monday. I don't think Berkeley even tells you if you get in until the end of April, and GA Tech wants an answer by May 1st. So, if I get an answer from Berkeley on Apr 29th that by some luck says i've been admitted, i'd have to decide very quickly to go or not go and i'd have no time to visit before I make that call. :(

    As far the type of environment i'm looking for.. I want a school where my classmates are hard-working and motivated, there are research opps and internships avail for undergrads. I want a good education that involves a balance between theory and real-world hands-on problems. I want to get enough exposure to things hands-on so that I know where I want to focus by the end of my undergrad experience. I want to be in an environment where I can find good study groups, tutoring, and where I can schedule appts to speak to professors about their research. I also want a school that people will see on my record and automatically know that I worked hard for my degree, and possibly will choose me over another potential job candidate because of that. Health food on campus is a plus, too! And, having a nice city nearby is nice, too. Tech jobs in the area are a must as well because my boyfriend is moving with me and he works in IT.
    ----

    I honestly haven't heard of any university keeping one as out-of-state. Usually it's the privates that charge a fixed rate for any given student, and the publics that differ with location.

    ** Someone who goes to GA Tech said she is in her 5th year and still pays out-of-state tuition. I think that sucks! I was hoping that i'd transfer in as out-of-state, but that after a year or so my status would change due to establishing residency. I still haven't heard back from any schools about this.
    --

    I am relatively positive that the UC's do have both in- and out-of-state tuition.

    Yes, they do. But, my question was on if you pay out-of-state for >1 year or if you get in-state after so long.


    ---
    I would strongly recommend visiting the www.collegeconfidential.com discussion boards. They have individual boards for all of your schools listed, as well as a multitude of information and knowledge that I think you would find very usefull.

    Never heard of it, but i'm going to head over to that site for sure. Thanks!!

    Much appreciated.
    Angela.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2005
  18. Mar 4, 2005 #17
    The tutition for out of state students is ridiculously more than residents too. Plus transfering into the college of engineering here is a total *****. They won't let you change your major under any circumstances, and you have to make up a lot of classes if they don't think the ones from your old college were good enough.

    But it is true that the cheme program here is really hardcore. So if you wanna do it, make sure you want to be a chemical engineer and you wanna make all the sacrifices (money and otherwise).
    -----------------------------

    ** A total *****? Can you replace that with a suitable word, i'm not sure what you meant.

    Honestly, i'm going to focus on Chem E, but it is mostly because I like the idea of engineering, and I love Chemistry. I have no idea where I want to focus in Chem E.

    I am set on choosing a school that commands my attention, I need a major change of study habits because I am severely lacking in them to be honest. I have found getting A's to be fairly easy here in Community College, and I know that won't be the case when I transfer. But, I am trying to mentally prepare myself for that and am willing to make the sacrifices.

    I have no idea if i'll get into Berkeley, but i'm trying to figure out before hand if it would be a better choice for me to go there or GA Tech. And, financially, I guess it really isn't all that much different when you think about it. Now, it's just coming down to the environment, and it is hard to know what the environment is like until you get there. Any other info or comparisons would still be great. Considering what i'm looking for in a school, how do you feel Berkeley would suit me? (see above post).

    Thanks!!
    Angela.
     
  19. Mar 4, 2005 #18

    BobG

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Why would the internships be of similar quality?

    Back in my hometown, the local university, University of Akron, was a very good, if somewhat unknown Chemical Engineering school, thanks to Goodyear, Firestone, Goodrich, etc. They had a very close relationship to the rubber companies with excellent work-study programs and the rubber companies put a lot of money into the chemical engineering department (aside from Chemical Engineering, the school was barely more than a glorified community college). I doubt their engineering school is that good anymore even if they still have nice buildings - every single rubber company moved (at one time, Akron led the nation in unemployment) - but there is a lesson there.

    If you're looking for a bargain, check where the chemical industries are. A few of the lesser known schools still have quite a bit of money poored into one program because of a good relationship with the surrounding industries. LSU might be worth checking out - petro-chemical companies line the Mississippi between Baton Rouge and New Orleans.
     
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